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Fergyson Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fergyson'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 16 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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National ArchivesApprentices registered in Scotland (1750-1754)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces and from Scotland. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1750-1754)
People in the News (1767)
Births, marriages and deaths, reports of crimes, trials and hangings, and general news, mainly from England, reported in the Chronicle section of the Annual Register

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People in the News
 (1767)
Inhabitants of Kendal in Westmorland (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Hull). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Kendal in Westmorland
 (1790-1797)
Insolvents (1826)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1826)
British sea officers (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists the 177 flag officers of the Royal Navy; the 670 captains (including superannuated and retired) and 751 commanders. The captains and commanders are given in order of precedence, determined by the dates of their appointment. Then there is a list of the ships of the navy, annotated with the names of their captains, with a separate section for steam vessels; packet brigs at Falmouth; and mail steam vessels at Dover, Weymouth, Pembroke, Liverpool, Holyhead and Portpatrick.

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British sea officers
 (1841)
National ArchivesResidents of Dartmouth Street, Westminster (1851)
In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 8 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480

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Residents of Dartmouth Street, Westminster
 (1851)
Unclaimed Dividends (1855)
The unclaimed dividend books of the Bank of England, containing names and descriptions of over 20,000 persons entitled to many millions of pounds accumulated in the bank unclaimed during the 18th and 19th centuries, mostly in consols and annuities, and transferred to the Commissioners for the Reduction of the National Debt.

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Unclaimed Dividends
 (1855)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Gorgon in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Gorgon, a 6-gun steam sloop, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Gorgon in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Trafalgar in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Trafalgar, a 120-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Trafalgar in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
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