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Fegen Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fegen'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 31 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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National ArchivesSailors on board H. M. S. Swiftsure (1796-1798)
His Majesty's ship the Swiftsure took part in the destruction of the French fleet in Aboukir Bay at the mouth of the Nile ('the Battle of the Nile') on the evening of the 1st and morning of the 2nd August 1798. This is the muster book for 1 August to 30 September 1798: being a continuation book in a series covering wages and victualling from May 1796, it also includes the names of some men who had died, deserted or been discharged from the ship from then to August 1798. Of the ship's complement of 590, this index covers the sailors, volunteers, and boys, as well as the supernumeraries and the retinue of William Parker, Rear-Admiral of the Red: but not the marines, or the French prisoners taken after the battle. Usually each man's entry gives his birthplace, and also his age on entering the ship.

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Sailors on board H. M. S. Swiftsure
 (1796-1798)
British sea officers (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists the 177 flag officers of the Royal Navy; the 670 captains (including superannuated and retired) and 751 commanders. The captains and commanders are given in order of precedence, determined by the dates of their appointment. Then there is a list of the ships of the navy, annotated with the names of their captains, with a separate section for steam vessels; packet brigs at Falmouth; and mail steam vessels at Dover, Weymouth, Pembroke, Liverpool, Holyhead and Portpatrick.

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British sea officers
 (1841)
The Edinburgh Gazette (1846)
The Edinburgh Gazette is the official publication in which various Scottish legal notices are issued, as well as promotions and casualty lists for the British army as a whole, and brief lists of English bankrupts. The key source for tracing details of Scottish bankruptcies, insolvencies, and dissolutions of business partnerships.

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The Edinburgh Gazette 
 (1846)
British Army Officers (1853)
The 14th volume of the New Annual Army List, for 1853, corrected to 30 December 1852, was published by Major H. G. Hart of the 49th Regiment. It contained 'the dates of commissions, and a statement of the war services and wounds of nearly every officer in the Army, Ordnance and Marines'. The first section, pages 1 to 111, lists officers of the rank of major and above in order of rank and precedence; officers with local rank (112-114); Yeomen of the Guard (115); the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (116); Headquarters Staff (117); and then (as in the scan) all the regiments and units in order of precedence, giving any regimental honours, with all the officers by rank, and details of postings, facings and agents (118-336). A long section (337-426) then lists officers on the retired full pay and half-pay, including the Royal Regiment of Artillery, Corps of Royal Engineers, Royal Marines and military departments. Then there are lists of officers in the Commissariat Department, the Medical Department, Veterinary Surgeons and the Chaplains Department. A section of Officers on the Foreign Half-Pay gives lists for the German Legion and Miscellaneous Corps (Brunswick Cavalry, Brunswick Infantry, Chasseurs Britanniques, Royal Corsican Rangers, Dillon's Regiment, Greek Light Infantry, Royal Malta Regiment, Meuron's Regiment, Roll's Regiment, Sicilian Regiment, Watteville's Regiment, York Light Infantry Volunteers, the Foreign Veteran Battalion, and the Foreign Corps of Waggoners). After lists of officers in garrisons and military establishments, there are sections listing officers holding Gold Decorations for their parts in various important actions and other British decorations, and those holding medals bestowed by foreign powers.

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British Army Officers
 (1853)
Insolvents (1854)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1854)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Princess Royal in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Princess Royal, a 90-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Princess Royal in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Royal Albert in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Royal Albert, a 120-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site. This index also covers the Royal Albert's two tenders, the Clinker and the Grinder.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Royal Albert in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Transit in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Transit took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Transit in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
National ArchivesBritish artillerymen fighting in Egypt (1882)
The war medal roll for the Egyptian campaign of 1882 is annotated to show those men actually present at Tel-el-Kebir, and thereby also entitled to the Tel-el-Kebir clasp. In addition, there follows an almost duplicate roll of men entitled to the Bronze Star granted by the Khedive of Egypt in recognition of the campaign. Several brigades of Royal Artillery took part in the operations.

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British artillerymen fighting in Egypt
 (1882)
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