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Fawns Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fawns'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 13 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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London and Middlesex crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: the accused (1835)
Henry Buckler copied in shorthand the proceedings of trials at the Central Criminal Court in London, and his transcripts were printed. This volume (iii), from 1836, covers sessions i to vi of the Copeland mayoralty of 1835 to 1836. The bulk of the cases were from London and Middlesex, with separate sections for Essex, Kent and Surrey, but, preceding all these, Capital Convictions. The names of the accused are annotated with an asterisk to show if they had previously been in custody; an obelisk indicates a known associate of bad characters. Most cases resulted in a guilty verdict, and a large proportion of these led to a sentence of transportation to Australia. This index covers those accused in the London and Middlesex cases of November 1835.

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London and Middlesex crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: the accused
 (1835)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Megaera in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Megaera, a 6-gun screw steamer frigate, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Megaera in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
Civil Service Appointments (1862)
The Civil Service Commission published an annual list of all persons who had obtained certificates of qualification for appointment in the various public departments. The list gives full name (surname first); department (such as Post Office, or Inland Revenue); situation (such as Letter-carrier, or Clerk); and date of certificate. Candidates whose names are preceded by a dagger obtained appointments as the result of competition; a double dagger indicates open competition. Those whose names are preceded by an asterisk obtained honorary additions to their certificates either for proficiency in extra subjects chosen by themselves, or for marked proficiency in the prescribed subjects. Then follows a further list of these candidates who had obtained Honorary Additions to their Certificates in this way: giving name (surname and initials); position in the service (department and situation); subjects for which honorary additions were made; and 'extent of knowledge displayed' (such as Creditable, Fair, or Very Creditable). 1 January to 31 December 1862.

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Civil Service Appointments
 (1862)
Residents and Householders of Croydon (1865)
The sixth edition of 'The Commercial and General Directory of the Town and Parish of Croydon; including South Norwood, Upper Norwood, Woodside, Stroud Green, and Shirley' published by F. Warren in 1865, includes this 'Alphabetical Arrangement of the Principal Residents and Householders'. The abbreviation S N stands for South Norwood; T H for Thornton Heath; and U N for Upper Norwood.

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Residents and Householders of Croydon
 (1865)
Men-at-the-Bar (1885)
Joseph Foster's Hand-List of Men-at-the-Bar gives a paragraph biography of men who had been called to the bar and were alive in 1885. After the full name (surname first, in capitals) there is a short statement of occupation or practice; a student at which inn of court; when called to the bar; father's name and then address; when born; if married, and, if so, wife's name (and her father's name) is often given. At the foot, in small type, is present residence, as of 1885.

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Men-at-the-Bar
 (1885)
National ArchivesLondon Metropolitan Police (1902-1911)
The London Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/337) lists policemen joining the force 14 July 1902 to 10 April 1911 (warrant numbers 88812 to 100006). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letters of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. The information about removal is sometimes wanting. A final column of 'Remarks' is largely blank, but occasionally gives an alias or a cross-reference to another warrant number. The register is discoloured and damaged in places, and one or two pages are missing.

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London Metropolitan Police
 (1902-1911)
Boys entering Marlborough College (1920)
The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.

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Boys entering Marlborough College
 (1920)
Anglican clergy (1930)
Crockford's Clerical Directory listed all Anglican clergy in the British Isles, India, the colonies, Europe, Asia and South America. The 59th annual issue, for 1930, is based on returns from all the individuals listed. The details given are: name (surname first, in capitals) in bold, prefixed by an asterisk in the case of university electors, and by a dagger whether the return had not been made, or it had been imperfectly filled up; name of theological college and/or university, and degrees, with years; a bold d followed by year and diocese signifies date of ordination as deacon and by which bishop; then a bold p, similarly for ordination as priest; posts (C: curate; I: incumbent; V; vicar; R: rector) with parishes and years; address; telephone number; and lists of books &c. where appropriate. In the case of the man then holding an English, Irish, Scottish or Welsh benefice, additional details are given - a bold P signifies the patron of the advowson; then the income, with items such as Q. A. B. (Queen Anne's Bounty), Eccles(iastical) Comm(issioners), Fees, e. o. (Easter Offerings), Pew Rents, T(ithe) R(ent) C(harge), Gl(ebe), &c.

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Anglican clergy
 (1930)
Officers of the British Army and of the Indian Army (1934)
The Half-Yearly Army List, issued By Authority, 30 June 1934, lists all officers in active service at that date, and this list was evidence of the status and rank of the officers contained in it. The entries are set out as a gradation list, by rank, from field-marshals to lieutenants, and within each rank in order of seniority at that rank. Each officer's name (surname first, in capitals, then christian name and present rank (with date of achieving that rank) and regiment &c. are given, for convenience, in bold type, with any national decorations in italics after the name. Each entry also gives date of birth, number of days service in the ranks, dates of service in each rank of officer, particular offices and postings (with dates) and, where appropriate, a summary of war service, and medals. For all but the oldest of the officers then serving, the war service details are for the Great War (1914-1921), and campaigns in Iraq, Waziristan, and the North West Frontier of India. War services are not given in this edition for Indian Army officers, except in that their entries are preceded by a crossed swords symbol where they have seen war service in a theatre of war overseas. After the gradation list of officers, there is a section for the Royal Malta Artillery; and then (pages 1152 to 1185) warrant officers - staff or garrison serjeant-majors, educational serjeant-majors, serjeant-major (physical training and educational) instructors, regimental serjeant-majors (and corporal-majors, farrier-serjeant majors, master gunners, assistant instructors in gunnery, experimental serjeant-majors, artillery clerks, farrier-serjeant-majors, artificer serjeant-majors, clerks of works, mechanist, superintending clerks, draughtsmen, 1st class staff serjeant-majors, transport, supply, conductors, sub-conductors, armourers, armament artificers, headmasters, schoolmasters, marine gunners, and bandmasters. The section for the Royal Army Chaplains' Department lists all chaplains (1st to 3rd class); and that for Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service has all matrons, sisters and staff nurses. The lists of nurses do not give date of birth: all are unmarried. The book concludes with the Yeomen of the Guard, the Honourable Company of Gentlemen-at-Arms, and the King's Body Guard for Scotland, in each case giving name (surname and initials, not christian names), honours, name of late regiment, and date of appointment.

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Officers of the British Army and of the Indian Army
 (1934)
Residents of Bournemouth (1934)
Kelly's Directory of Bournemouth and Poole for 1934 includes this section listing private residents in Bournemouth, Branksome Park, Boscombe, Boscombe East, Ensbury, Ensbury Park, Pokesdown and Winton.

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Residents of Bournemouth
 (1934)
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