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Farney Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'farney'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Close Rolls (1447-1454)
The close rolls of the 26th to 32nd years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1447-1454)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered at Yarmouth in Norfolk (1713-1715)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. July 1713 to April 1715. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Masters of Apprentices registered at Yarmouth in Norfolk
 (1713-1715)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Newcastle-under-Lyme (1762)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/54

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Apprentices registered in Newcastle-under-Lyme
 (1762)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Scotland (1771)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Durham return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/57

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Masters of apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1771)
Bedfordshire Freeholders and Occupiers: Woburn (1807)
A poll for two knights of the shire for the county of Bedford, was taken at Bedford from 11 to 22 May 1807, the candidates being Francis Pym esquire (1138 votes), the Rt Hon Richard Fitzpatrick (1084) and John Osborn esquire (1069). The poll book is arranged by hundred, and then by parish or township, giving the freeholders' names, residence, 'of what the freehold consists' (e. g. H. & L. for house and land), the occupier, and the vote cast. Non-voters are not listed: but at the end of each hundred there is a list of rejected votes, giving full name of voter, situation of the property, ground of rejection, and candidates for whom the votes were tendered.

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Bedfordshire Freeholders and Occupiers: Woburn
 (1807)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Missionary donations from Scotland (1855)
The Congregational and a number of other independent churches together formed the Evangelical Alliance, committed to promoting and supporting missions to the heathen. The areas chosen for their projects were Guiana, South Africa, India, the South Seas and China. The work of the missionaries was not only in preaching the Gospel, but also in translating the Bible into local languages, and establishing churches, schools and orphanages. Orphans and native teachers were often given the names of principal contributors or congregations back in Britain. In Britain the large amounts of money needed for this work were raised among the Congregational and independent congregations, arranged by auxiliaries for each county (although some contributions for each county might in fact come in from congregations and individuals in neighbouring areas); money was gathered by ministers, at special services, by supporters, and in missionary boxes. The accounts of all these contributions were published as part of a monthly magazine called the Evangelical Magazine. Each issue of the magazine carried obituaries of prominent members of the congregations; general articles on religion; reviews of newly-published religious books; home news, mainly about meetings of importance or interest by the alliance or in individual churches; and then a separate section called the Missionary Chronicle. The Missionary Chronicle was devoted to letters and reports from the missionaries; and concludes with a set of accounts of donations towards the missionary work. This is the index to the donations reported in the magazine, January to December 1855, from Scotland.

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Missionary donations from Scotland
 (1855)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1880)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, April to June 1880

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1880)
Unclaimed Naval Prize Money (1855-1902)
Various prize moneys were awarded to officers and men who served on board her Majesty's ships. For one reason or another a substantial number of these prizes, from as little as a shilling or two to as much as many pounds, remained undistributed by 1902, when this comprehensive list of the unclaimed moneys was printed: it lists unclaimed shares of prize money, slave and pirate bounties, salvage awards, parliamentary grants, gratuities and other moneys distributed by the Admiralty 1855 to 1902, but which omits moneys for service on the China Station during the war of 1856 to 1880, and special gratuities for service in Egypt (1882), Soudan (1884) and Soudan and Nile Expedition (1884-1885), for which there are separate indexes. In each case the sailor's name is given first (surname, then christian name or initials); rank or rating; ship in which serving at time of capture or award; and the amount due.

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Unclaimed Naval Prize Money
 (1855-1902)
Anglican clergy (1930)
Crockford's Clerical Directory listed all Anglican clergy in the British Isles, India, the colonies, Europe, Asia and South America. The 59th annual issue, for 1930, is based on returns from all the individuals listed. The details given are: name (surname first, in capitals) in bold, prefixed by an asterisk in the case of university electors, and by a dagger whether the return had not been made, or it had been imperfectly filled up; name of theological college and/or university, and degrees, with years; a bold d followed by year and diocese signifies date of ordination as deacon and by which bishop; then a bold p, similarly for ordination as priest; posts (C: curate; I: incumbent; V; vicar; R: rector) with parishes and years; address; telephone number; and lists of books &c. where appropriate. In the case of the man then holding an English, Irish, Scottish or Welsh benefice, additional details are given - a bold P signifies the patron of the advowson; then the income, with items such as Q. A. B. (Queen Anne's Bounty), Eccles(iastical) Comm(issioners), Fees, e. o. (Easter Offerings), Pew Rents, T(ithe) R(ent) C(harge), Gl(ebe), &c.

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Anglican clergy
 (1930)
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