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Fairburn Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fairburn'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 125 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Yorkshire Inquisitions (1241-1283)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Both sets of inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association, and printed in 1891. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1241-1283)
Pontefract Cartulary (1100-1300)
The Cluniac monastery of St John the Evangelist at Pontefract (Pomfret) in the West Riding of Yorkshire, was founded in the 11th century by Robert de Lascy. The grants of land made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which eventually came to Godfrey Wentworth of Woolley Park. This was edited by Richard Holmes and published by Yorkshire Archaeological Society in 1899 and 1902. The individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated: the numbering of the charters is modern, and amounts to 561. The cartulary itself contains 11 fasciculi, to which Holmes gave these section names - I. The Seigniorial Charters; II. The Ecclesiastical Charters; III. Royal Charters and Confirmations; IV. The Local Charters (Pontefract &c.); V. The Ledstone Charters; VI. The Ledsham Charters; VII. Miscellaneous Charters; VIII. The Peckfield and other Charters; IX. and X. Scarborough and other Charters; and XI. Leases to Tenants. Ledston(e), Ledsham and Peckfield are all close to Pontefract, as is most of the property.

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Pontefract Cartulary
 (1100-1300)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1569-1578)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1569 to June 1578, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by John Hill Burton, Historiographer Royal for Scotland, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1878. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1569-1578)
Intended Brides in Yorkshire (1627)
William Paver, a 19th-century Yorkshire genealogist, made brief abstracts of early marriage licences (now lost) in York Registry. His manuscript, which became Additional Manuscripts 29667 in the British Museum, was transcribed by J. W. Clay, F. S. A., and printed in various issues of the Yorkshire Archaeological Journal: this is from the volume for 1903. Paver did not note the dates of the licences, merely listing them by year: his abstracts give the names and addresses of both parties, and the name of the parish church in which it was intended that the wedding would take place.

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Intended Brides in Yorkshire
 (1627)
Yorkshire Marriage Licences (1629)
William Paver, a 19th-century Yorkshire genealogist, made brief abstracts of early marriage licences (now lost) in York Registry

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Yorkshire Marriage Licences
 (1629)
Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham (1626-1638)
Sexual and religious behaviour, marriage and probate were under the purview of the ecclesiastical courts in England at this period, exercised through the individual dioceses and archdeaconries. The diocese of Durham included the whole of county Durham, Northumberland (except for Hexhamshire) and Alston in Cumberland. The High Commission Court dealt with cases from the whole diocese, and a book of court acts from 1628 to 1639, and another of depositions from 1626 to 1638, survived in the dean and chapter library, were edited by W. Hylton Dyer Longstaffe, and published by the Surtees Society in 1858. This is not a complete abstract of the record: there are hundreds of cases for contempt of the ordinary jurisdiction, of which only a few were selected as examples 'in consequence of the rank of the persons proceeded against or other contents of interest'. However, all cases in which the nature of the offence occurs are traced from start to finish, but omitting much of the proceedings in between. The names and ages of all the deponents are recorded.

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Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham
 (1626-1638)
Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland (1675-1685)
This correspondence deals with a large variety of personal and public affairs in Ireland and England. The collection also includes lists of Irish wool licences and licencees, 1678 to 1681

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Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland
 (1675-1685)
State Papers Domestic (1702-1703)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State, as well as other miscellaneous records. 1 March 1702 to 31 May 1703. The calendar was prepared by Robert Pentland Mahaffy, with certain classes of document extracted and placed in separate appendices (called Tables): I, caveats; II, church and university appointments, &c.; III, commissions, warrants for commissions, notes of commissions and notes of warrants for commissions in the English army for 1702; IV, lord lieutenants and deputy lieutenants; V, Irish warrants; VI, weekly lists of ships of the Home Fleet with their stations and orders; VII, passes, notes of passes, post warrants and licences of absence; VIII, orders on petitions; IX, Scottish warrants and commissions; and X, miscellaneous royal warrants (to the Attorney or Solicitor General; in criminal cases; diplomatic; military warrants; miscellaneous warrants; secretary's warrants, allowance of bills, &c.; and notes of warrants for the appointment of almsmen). The source material in the Public Record Office that he drew on in making this compilation is referenced throughout, and is from the State Papers Domestic (and Military, Naval, Signet Office, Various, and Letter Books and Entry Books), State Papers Scotland (Correspondence, Letter Books and Warrants), State Papers Ireland (and King's Letter Books), and State Papers Channel Islands.

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State Papers Domestic
 (1702-1703)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in York (1755)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Liverpool return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/52

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Apprentices registered in York
 (1755)
Tradesmen of York (1559-1759)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city. Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 16,600 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year. Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen (per patres); and a handful who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

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Tradesmen of York
 (1559-1759)
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