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Exon Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'exon'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 40 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1317-1321)
Clerks and Clergy in Somerset (1309-1329)
The register of bishop John de Drokenesford of Bath and Wells, edited by Bishop Hobhouse and published by the Somerset Record Society in 1887. It contains general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, but with some parochial affairs and disputes with names of parishioners. There are no ordination lists. The diocese of Bath and Wells at this period was almost exactly coextensive with the county of Somerset.

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Clerks and Clergy in Somerset
 (1309-1329)
Freemen and citizens of London (1314-1337)
Letter Book D, or the Liber Rubeus (Red Book) of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c. In addition, this volume includes the record of admissions to the freedom of the city by redemption (payment of a sum of money), and the binding and discharge of apprenticeships for the same period. Without freedom of the city - which could only be gained by birth (patrimony), apprenticeship or servitude, or by redemption - no man could open a shop, sell goods retail, or even reside within the city walls (except for a limited time, and then only in the houses of freemen and under frankpledge). The text was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe and printed by order of the Corporation of the City of London in 1902.

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Freemen and citizens of London
 (1314-1337)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1305-1342)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Clement V, John XXII and Benedict XII. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Clement V was consecrated and crowned 14 November 1305 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); John XXII was crowned 5 September 1316; Benedict XII 8 January 1335 and died 25 April 1342. From 1309 onwards the papacy was in exile at Avignon. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss from Regesta lii to cxxxvi, and published in 1895. Bliss remarked that 'although the writing of the Papal Registers of the 14th century is clearer than that of many contemporary English MSS., the entries in them were for the most part founded upon petitions or letters from different countries, and the scribes in the Papal Chancery must have experienced even greater difficulty in copying English proper names than English students experience nowadays in reading the early Chancery Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office. Not having local or personal knowledge, they constantly misread doubtful letters.'

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1305-1342)
Lancashire and Cheshire tenants, patrons and friends of Whalley abbey (1178-1350)
About to leave for the Holy Land in 1178, John, constable of Chester, founded an abbey at Stanlawe (Stanlow) in Cheshire, endowing it with the townships of Staneye (Stanney) and Aston. Inundated by the sea at Stanlow, the monastery was removed to Whalley in Lancashire in 1294, and this foundation of Cistercians (grey monks) became one of the wealthiest in northern England. It received grants of lands in Ince, Garston, Childewall, Aykebergh, Little Woolton and Warrington in southwest Lancashire; Eccles, Barton, Maunton, Swynton, Pendleton, Worsley, Hulton, Westhalghton, Rumworth, Pendlebury, Cadishead and Denton in the south; Spotland, Chadwick, Castleton, Marland, Todmorden, Rochdale, Whitworth, Heley, Falenge, Chaderton, Wardle, Howarth and Saddleworth in the east; Wytton, Derwent, Plesyngton, Balderston, Salebury, Read, Downham, Clithero, Ribchester, Withnall, Wheelton and Stanworth in Blackburn hundred; and Warton, Carleton, Steyninges, Elswick and Preston in Amounderness hundred; as well as further property in Cheshire, in Chester, Nantwich, Northwich, Aston, Backford, Walton and Wynlaton. A careful copy of all these grants was compiled in the 14th century in what is called the Coucher Book or C(h)artulary of Whalley Abbey. The evidence had been carefully sorted and collated in twenty chapters or titles, each containing a transcript of the grants and evidences relating to a separate parish or township. The people that appear in these deeds are the donors, the witnesses, and occasionally tenants or occupiers of adjoining plots of land. The Coucher Book was edited for the Chetham Society by W. A. Hulton, and published in four volumes, starting in 1847.

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Lancashire and Cheshire tenants, patrons and friends of Whalley abbey
 (1178-1350)
Militia in Taunton hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Angersleigh, Bishops Hull, Bradford on Tone, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Combe Florey, Corfe, Cothelstone, Heathfield, Hillfarrance, Kingston St Mary, Lydeard St Lawrence, Norton Fitzwarren, Nynehead, Oake, Orchard Portman, Otterford, Pitminster, Rimpton, Ruishton, Staplegrove, Stoke St Mary, (the borough of) Taunton, Tolland, Trull, West Bagborough, Wilton and Withiel Flory. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Taunton hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1591)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1591)
Inhabitants of Somerset (1607-1625)
The Reverend E. H. Bates prepared extracts from the Somerset quarter session records of 1607 to 1625 for publication by the Somerset Record Society (xxiii) in 1907. The period is covered by quarter sessions minute book 1 (1613 to 1620) and part of book 2 (1620-1627); these are based on the rolls of recognizances (taken, discharged and forfeited); criminal indictments (not touched on in Bates's extracts); and sessions rolls 1 to 16 (abstracted by A. J. Monday). The records covered and illustrated by these extracts are introduced under the heads Sessions Business; Relief of the Poor; Apprentices, Bastards and Lunatics; Charities (Alms- and Pest-Houses); Housing the Poor; Roads and Bridges; Rates and Appeals; Houses of Correction; and Drink Traffic.

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Inhabitants of Somerset
 (1607-1625)
Official Papers (1627-1628)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1627-1628)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1679-1687)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1679-1687)
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