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Euer Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'euer'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 6 records (displaying 1 to 6): 

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Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)
The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This second part contains the charters numbered DXCIV to MCLXXXIX. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated. The charters in this section are arranged by place, under the heads 'Normanby; Martona; Thornaby; Ugthorpe et Pecibiggyng; Levingtona; Jarum; Castle Levington; Kepwyck; Feyceby; Atona; Thresk; Neuton; Estona; Lackenby; Lyum; Cotum; Scheltona; Brottona; Moresom; Glasedale Daneby et Moresum; Kylton; Lofthus; Esingtona; Lyverton; Daneby; Glasdale; Uggethorpe; Percybyggyng; Sletholme; Scalynge; Redker; Merske; Hesele; Lunde super le Walde; Kirkburn; Rotsea; Bainton; Tibthorpe; Ingleby Arncliff; East Harlsey; Sawcock; Scarth; Stokesley; Kirkby-in-Cleveland; Battersby; Stainton-in-Cleveland; Maltby; Ayresome; York; Sinnington; Barningham and Newsham; Aylesby; Kelsterne; Bridekirk and Appleton; Aislaby; Hart and Hartlepool; Castle Eden; and Annandale'. Three further sections are added from other sources: 1. Documents connected with the burning of the priory church in 1289; 2. Extracts from the registers of the archbishops of York relating to the priory, 1238 to 1337; 3. A rent roll of the priory of about 1300 (pp. 412 to 450), giving many names of tenants.

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Guisborough Cartulary
 (1119-1300)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1294-1303)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1902. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c. The volume also includes two stray inquests, from 1245 and 1282.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1294-1303)
Yorkshire Charters (1300-1309)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Yorkshire Charters
 (1300-1309)
Landowners and tenants in Northumberland (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

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Landowners and tenants in Northumberland
 (1345-1485)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
Inhabitants of London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet. Private Residences'. About 10,000 people are recorded.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1805)
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