Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Eir Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'eir'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Buy all
Get all 11 records to view, to save and print for £50.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Pipe Roll (1241-1242)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the roll for the 26th year of the reign of king Henry III, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1241 to Michaelmas 1242. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and fines or pardons arising from the proceedings of the justices. The text was edited by Henry Lewin Cannon for Yale Historical Publications and printed in 1918. The name of the county is given at the head of each page, and variant spellings, omissions and additions found in the duplicate Chancellor's Roll [C. R.] are given in the footnotes.

EIR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Pipe Roll
 (1241-1242)
Clerks and Clergy in Worcestershire and southwest Warwickshire. (1268-1301)
The register of bishop Godfrey Giffard of Worcester, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, but with some parochial affairs and disputes with names of parishioners. The diocese of Worcester at this period was almost exactly coextensive with the county of Worcester (minus its western finger), plus southwest Warwickshire (including Warwick itself). The register also includes ordination lists (as in the sample scan) of subdeacons, deacons and priests.

EIR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Clerks and Clergy in Worcestershire and southwest Warwickshire.
 (1268-1301)
Close Rolls (1302-1307)
The close rolls of the 31st to 35th years of the reign of king Edward I, that is to the day of his death (7 July 1307), record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. In amongst this official material, the rolls were also used as a way of recording many acknowledgments of private debts and contracts between individuals. Most of the contents relate to England, but there are also entries concerning Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

EIR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Close Rolls
 (1302-1307)
Deeds from Bath in Somerset (1330-1339)
More than 500 mediaeval deeds survived in the muniment chest of Bath in Somerset, almost all dealing with the transfers of small plots of land in the city. Each names the grantor and grantee, describes the land, and is witnessed by other citizens. This printed edition was prepared by the Reverend C. W. Shickle, Master of St John's Hospital in Bath. Where (as in many cases) the earliest deeds were undated, he was able to assign periods to each on the basis of style and content, particularly the names of witnesses.

EIR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Deeds from Bath in Somerset
 (1330-1339)
Chester Plea Rolls (1377-1399)
This calendar of the deeds, inquisitions and writs of dower on the plea rolls of the palatinate of Chester of the reign of Richard II was edited by Peter Turner for the Public Record Office. As well as the records relating to the settling of landed property, there are many letters of protection granted to knights setting off to war in the north and in Ireland.

EIR. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Chester Plea Rolls
 (1377-1399)
Chester Plea Rolls (1399-1413)
This calendar of the deeds, inquisitions and writs of dower on the plea rolls of the palatinate of Chester of the reign of Henry IV was edited by Peter Turner for the Public Record Office. As well as the records relating to the settling of landed property, there are several inquisitions post mortem and a number of grants of pardon to erstwhile adherents of Richard II.

EIR. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Chester Plea Rolls
 (1399-1413)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1413-1416)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign of king Henry V (21 March 1413 to 20 March 1416) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. C. Fowler, and published in 1910. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. The commissions of the peace issued for the English towns and counties and entered on the rolls, being largely repetitive, have been consolidated in a single appendix.

EIR. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1413-1416)
Landowners and tenants in Derbyshire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

EIR. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Landowners and tenants in Derbyshire
 (1345-1485)
Landowners and tenants in Warwickshire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

EIR. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Landowners and tenants in Warwickshire
 (1345-1485)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

EIR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.