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Edgare Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'edgare'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 7 records (displaying 1 to 7): 

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Close Rolls (1441-1447)
The close rolls of the 20th to 25th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1441-1447)
Suffolk Charters (1530-1539)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Suffolk Charters
 (1530-1539)
Inhabitants of Calais, and visitors (1485-1543)
Richard Turpyn, a burgess of Calais, the English enclave on the French coast, compiled (or possessed) a chronicle of events there from 1485 to 1540, a copy of which survived among the Stowe manuscripts in the Harleian collection in the British Museum. This was edited for the Camden Society, together with a number of other papers relating to events in Calais in that period, by John Gough Nichols, and printed in 1846. Many of the persons named in the resulting book are knights and noblemen attending king Henry VII and king Henry VIII when on the Continent on diplomatic or marital business; but there is also a muster roll of the garrison of Calais of 1533 (136-139).

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Inhabitants of Calais, and visitors
 (1485-1543)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
London nobility and gentry (1791)
The Universal British Directory includes a list of the nobility, gentry, &c. in London and Westminster: esquires, i. e., gentlemen without titles, are sometimes listed without their christian names.

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London nobility and gentry
 (1791)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1858)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1858, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.

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Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1858)
Members of the Highland & Agricultural Society of Scotland: Kirkcudbright (1931)
This list of the 9739 members of the Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland was printed in 5th series, volume 43, of the society's Transactions. The list, which gives year of admission, full name (surname first) and address, is set out alphabetically by county and show division - Aberdeen, Angus (Eastern and Western districts), Argyll, Ayr, Banff, Berwick, Bute, Caithness, Clackmannan, Dumbarton, Dumfries, East Lothian, Fife, Inverness, Kincardine, Kinross, Kirkcudbright, Lanark, Mid-Lothian, Moray, Nairn, Orkney, Peebles, Perth (Perth and Stirling show districts), Renfrew, Ross & Cromarty, Roxburgh, Selkirk, Shetland, Stirling, Sutherland, West Lothian, and Wigtown, with separate sections for members living in England & Wales, Ireland, The Colonies and Foreign Countries. In addition, prior to 1900 holders of the Agricultural Diploma and the First-Class Certificate in Forestry had been eligible for free life membership, and those surviving are listed separately in an appendix.

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Members of the Highland & Agricultural Society of Scotland: Kirkcudbright
 (1931)
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