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Dynan Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'dynan'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1317-1321)
Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire (1361-1370)
The register of bishop Louis de Charltone of Hereford, containing general diocesan business, but also including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire.

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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire
 (1361-1370)
Revenue Coast Guard (1830-1831)
Appointments 11 August 1830 to 11 August 1831: 1a. Return of all persons appointed to situations in the department of the Excise, and of persons nominated as expectants to receive instructions to qualify them to become officers: giving date of appointment or nomination; name; station; salary and emolument. 1b. Return of all persons re-appointed to situations in the Excise: giving name; station in which dropped; salary and emoluments; when and to what station re-appointed; salary and emoluments. This return is split into England, Scotland and Ireland. 2. Return of the different persons appointed to situations in the departments of the Customs: stating port; office; name of officer; when admitted; and salary and emoluments. 3. This return of men appointed to situations in the Revenue Coast Guard: with date of appointment; name; rank; salary; and emoluments.

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Revenue Coast Guard
 (1830-1831)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Algiers in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). Her Majesty's Ship Algiers, a 90-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Algiers in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Royal Albert in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Royal Albert, a 120-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site. This index also covers the Royal Albert's two tenders, the Clinker and the Grinder.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Royal Albert in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 44th (The East Essex) Regiment of Foot, based at Colchester, having returned from the Crimea, embarked for India 26 August 1857, and was transferred thence to China. The regiment took part in the capture of the Taku Forts.

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British infantry fighting in China
 (1860)
Dublin Electors (1865)
This alphabetical list of electors for the City of Dublin for 1865 is annotated with details of the votes cast in the election of 15 July 1865 for a member of Parliament. The candidates were John Vance, Esq., D. L. (V), Benjamin Lee Guinness, Esq., D. L., LL. D. (G), and Jonathan Pim, Esq. (P). The first column gives, in bold, the initial of the ward in which lay the property that was the elector's qualification. The second column gives the elector's sequential number (alphabetically) within that ward. Then the elector's full name is given, surname first, and address, usually including house number. The votes cast are shown on the right: where these columns are blank, the elector did not vote. The key to the ward names is: A, South Dock; B, Donnybrook; C, Rathdown; D, Trinity; E, South City; F, Royal Exchange; G, Mansion House; H, Fitzwilliam; I, Wood Quay; K, Merchants' Quay; L, Usher's Quay; M, Arran Quay; N, Inns' Quay; O, North City; P, Rotundo; Q, Mountjoy; R; North Dock. S indicates the register of freemen.

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Dublin Electors
 (1865)
Freeholders in county Dublin (1873-1875)
Owners of an acre or more, whether resident there or elsewhere: with their addresses; the acreage; and a valuation of the land. The survey commenced in February 1873, the last returns being received in November 1875.

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Freeholders in county Dublin
 (1873-1875)
In police custody at Birmingham (1923)
The Police Gazette was published by Authority by the London Metropolitan Police, and circulated, as confidential, to the police forces throughout Britain and Ireland. The contents were based on the information routinely submitted to the Criminal Record Office. One of the regular features was a section entitled Persons in Custody, in which each police force gave details of people taken into custody on remand or awaiting trial. The name of the arresting force is given, with duration of remand &c., and nature of charge; then the full name of the suspect (in bold), the C. R. O. number; year of birth; height; complexion; colour of hair; colour of eyes; occupation; birthplace; and details of previous convictions. Variations of surname spelling and aliases are noted in the descriptions, and these variants and aliases have also been indexed.

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In police custody at Birmingham
 (1923)
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