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Dunning Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'dunning'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 453 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Pipe Roll (1201-1202)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. Two sets of pipe rolls were prepared, not exact duplicates, the main series being the Treasurer's or Exchequer rolls, the copies (of which fewer have survived) being the Chancellor's rolls. The Chancellor's roll (or Antigraphum) for the 3rd year of king John became separated from that series at some date, and found its way to the miscellaneous records in the Chapter House at Westminster. As it happens, the Chancellor's roll for that year is in a better state of preservation than the Treasurer's roll, so it was chosen for publication by the Commissioners on the Public Records of the Kingdom, by whom it was printed in extenso in 1833.

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Pipe Roll
 (1201-1202)
Liberate Rolls (1200-1211)
The chancery liberate rolls of the 2nd, 3rd and 5th years of the reign of king John (who came to the throne 27 May 1199) record the details of payments and allowances issued out of the Court of Chancery under the Great Seal of England, and were directed to the Treasurer. The rolls were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy and printed by the Record Commission in 1844. Included in the volume is a transcript of a Praestita Roll (on which were entered the sums of money which issued out of the treasuries by way of imprest, advance or accommodation) of the 12th year of king John and a Misae Roll (detailing the daily expenses of his court) of the 11th year. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1200-1211)
Elton (Huntingdonshire) Court Roll (1278)
Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey were the manors of Elton, Hemingford and Little Stukeley. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of five rotulets (Portf. 34, No. 46) includes a record of the proceedings at Hemingford manor court 17 November 1278; Elton 23 November 1278; and Little Stukeley 5 January 1279. These were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone.

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Elton (Huntingdonshire) Court Roll
 (1278)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire (1297)
Taxation roll of the lay (non-clergy) inhabitants of Yorkshire from the 25th year of the reign of king Edward I. Latin

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire
 (1297)
Clerks and Clergy in Worcestershire and southwest Warwickshire. (1268-1301)
The register of bishop Godfrey Giffard of Worcester, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, but with some parochial affairs and disputes with names of parishioners. The diocese of Worcester at this period was almost exactly coextensive with the county of Worcester (minus its western finger), plus southwest Warwickshire (including Warwick itself). The register also includes ordination lists (as in the sample scan) of subdeacons, deacons and priests.

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Clerks and Clergy in Worcestershire and southwest Warwickshire.
 (1268-1301)
Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire, Gloucestershire and Devon (1370-1375)
The register of bishop William de Courtenay of Hereford, containing general diocesan business, but also including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire. The ordinations for the first two years, 1370 and 1371, took place while the bishop was still resident in Devon, and contain mainly Devon men.

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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire, Gloucestershire and Devon
 (1370-1375)
Essex Poll Tax: Alphamstone and Bures (1381)
Charles Oman transcribed and edited the poll tax returns for Hinckford (Public Record Office Lay Subsidy Essex 107/68) for his study of the peasants' rising of 1381. Full lists of adults are given, township by township, grouped by status or occupation. There are returns for Alhamston & Buris (Alphamstone and Bures), Bewchamp Oton (Belchamp Otten), Bumstede ad T'rim (Steeple Bumpstead), Felstede (Felstead), Fynchyngfelde (Finchingfield), Gelham Parva (Little Yeldham), Gosfeld (Gosfield), Hythingham Sibill (Sible Hedingham), Ovyton (Ovington), Pentelowe (Pentlow), Salyng Magna (Great Saling), Stebbyng (Stebbing), and Sturmer.

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Essex Poll Tax: Alphamstone and Bures
 (1381)
Freemen of London (1540-1550)
The long series of mediaeval registers and books of admission of the freemen of London was destroyed by fire in 1786. Thirty surviving charred leaves were gathered together and rebound, becoming Egerton MS 2408 in the British Museum. The order is jumbled and generally speaking none can be dated with certainty, although all belong to the very end of the reign of Henry VIII and the start of the reign of his son, Edward VI. These are pages from the admission books. Each entry here usually gives the name of the person admitted to the freedom; his father's name, address and occupation; his entitlement to the freedom, usually by having served out an apprenticeship to a citizen, naming the master and his trade. Then there may follow a cross-reference to M. or N., being two volumes of another set of official books denoted by the letters of the alphabet, and following each other in chronological sequence, which evidently gave details of entries into apprenticeships. These other books no longer exist: but the dates given for entry do identify the start of the apprenticeship, and so give by implication a date for the eventual admission to freedom. In the margin is the name of the city ward and the total of the fee and fine paid on admission.

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Freemen of London
 (1540-1550)
Official Papers (1547-1580)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1547-1580)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
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