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Duffelde Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'duffelde'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 16 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Yorkshire Inquisitions (1241-1283)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Both sets of inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association, and printed in 1891. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1241-1283)
Hampshire and Surrey clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1389)
Ordinations as acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop William de Wykeham of Winchester. Winchester diocese covered Hampshire and Surrey; the ordinations also attracted many persons from distant dioceses bearing letters dimissory from their ordinaries, and these are duly noted in the text. Many of these clerks would not go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars are indicated ('f.' = brother). The acolyte lists usually give parish of origin or title. The sample scan is from 1404.

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Hampshire and Surrey clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1389)
Hampshire and Surrey clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1395)
Ordinations as acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop William de Wykeham of Winchester. Winchester diocese covered Hampshire and Surrey; the ordinations also attracted many persons from distant dioceses bearing letters dimissory from their ordinaries, and these are duly noted in the text. Many of these clerks would not go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars are indicated ('f.' = brother). The acolyte lists usually give parish of origin or title. The sample scan is from 1404.

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Hampshire and Surrey clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1395)
The English in France (1417-1418)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 5th year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1417 to 20 March 1418) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883.

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The English in France
 (1417-1418)
Close Rolls (1429-1435)
The close rolls of the 8th to 13th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France. Also included is the Exchange Roll of 1424 to 1434, of licences to transmit sums of money out of the realm.

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Close Rolls
 (1429-1435)
Close Rolls (1441-1447)
The close rolls of the 20th to 25th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1441-1447)
Yorkshire Testators and Legatees (1426-1466)
Wills and testaments from the diocese of York (Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Hexhamshire, Lancashire north of the Ribble, and southwest Westmorland) registered at York. Richmond and Southwell archdeaconries had their own lower probate jurisdictions, so the wills registered at York are predominantly from the East and West Ridings and the eastern part of the North Riding of Yorkshire. In theory, wills dealt with real property and testaments with personal property, but the distinction hardly applies in practice: most of these wills are in Latin, but some are in English. Being before the Reformation, they commonly start with benefactions to churches, chantries, chapels, &c., and with provisions for the burning of candles ('lights') and saying of masses.

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Yorkshire Testators and Legatees
 (1426-1466)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1471-1484)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of pope Sixtus IV. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Many of the names in the text were clearly a puzzle to the scribes in Rome, and spelling of British and Irish placenames and surnames is chaotic. Sixtus IV was consecrated and crowned 25 August 1471 (the day from which his pontificate is dated) and died at Rome 12 August 1484. The extracts were made by J. A. Twemlow from Vatican Regesta dxlvi to dclxxxi and Lateran Regesta dccxiii to dcccxxxviii, and published in 1955. Not all the Lateran registers survive from this pontificate, but were still in existence in the 18th century, when indexes were compiled giving rubricelle, or brief summaries of the papal bulls; nor, indeed, have all these indexes now survived, but Twemlow added an appendix listing all the rubricelle relating to the British Isles extant for the reign of Sixtus IV.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1471-1484)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1542-1547)
The Privy Council of Henry VIII was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1542-1547)
Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

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Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
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