Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Drum Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'drum'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 18 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Open Access
Buying all 18 results of this search individually would cost £104.00. But you can have free access to all 18 records for a year, to view, to save and print, for £100. Save £4.00. More...

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Merchants and traders in Aberdeen (1399-1631)
A. M. Munro searched the council registers of the royal burgh of Aberdeen, and compiled this list of burgesses admited to the borough. The entries prior to 1591 were contained in lists engrossed in the council registers at the close of the minutes for the year ending at Michaelmas, but after that date in addition to the annual lists, which are continued, there is almost always a separate minute of admission under the respective dates. The records before 1591 are not only sparser, often with no more than a name, but are also lacking for 1401-1405, 1413-1432, 1434-1435, 1518-1519, 1557 and 1562-1564 - other blanks were filled in from the guildry accounts where such existed. Guild burgesses were allowed unfettered trading rights in Aberdeen; simple burgesses could only deal in Scottish wares (so being barred from the lucrative English and Flemish imports and exports); trade burgesses were limited to their own particular trades; and the council was able ex gratia to create honourary burgesses, who were accorded the full privileges of burgesses of guild and trade, and among whom numbered members of almost every family of note in Aberdeenshire. Burgesses could thus be created by descent, by apprenticeship into a trade, or ex gratia, and in the later portions of this roll the precise circumstances are usually given, sometimes also with the name of a cautioner or surety. Burgesses, masters and cautioners are all indexed here.

DRUM. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Merchants and traders in Aberdeen
 (1399-1631)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Edinburgh (1720-1723)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. There was a single collection for the whole of Scotland, made in Edinburgh. The sums collected are recorded in Scottish money, with conversion to sterling for transfer to London. A Scottish pund was worth 20 English pence. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1719. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

DRUM. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Apprentices registered at Edinburgh
 (1720-1723)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Berkshire (1755)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Liverpool return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/52

DRUM. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Apprentices registered in Berkshire
 (1755)
National ArchivesApprentices (1771)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 18 March to 31 December 1771.

DRUM. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Apprentices
 (1771)
London nobility and gentry (1791)
The Universal British Directory includes a list of the nobility, gentry, &c. in London and Westminster: esquires, i. e., gentlemen without titles, are sometimes listed without their christian names.

DRUM. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London nobility and gentry
 (1791)
Irish Insolvents (1837)
Insolvency notices for Ireland: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links, especially for emigrants

DRUM. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Irish Insolvents
 (1837)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1849)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1849, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.

DRUM. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1849)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1850)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1850, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.

DRUM. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1850)
National ArchivesPrisoners in the House of Correction at Westminster (1851)
The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The House of Correction of the City of Westminster was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Stephen's; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were 21 officers, 8 members of their families, and 6 servants; the institution held 737 prisoners - 245 men and 492 women. HO 107/1480

DRUM. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Prisoners in the House of Correction at Westminster
 (1851)
National ArchivesMen of the East Suffolk regiment who fought in the New Zealand War (1863-1870)
New Zealand War Medal roll for the 12th (East Suffolk) Regiment of Foot: for service in the New Zealand campaign 1863 to 1867: the rolls were compiled following a general order in 1869 and the medals were distributed in 1870. The 1st battalion, based at Bury St Edmunds, embarked for Australia 1 July 1854, served in Tasmania, and was moved to New Zealand in 1863; the men returned to England in 1867.

DRUM. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Men of the East Suffolk regiment who fought in the New Zealand War
 (1863-1870)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.