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Doughlas Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'doughlas'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Proprietors of Coventry Union Banking Company (1838)
The provincial banks of England and Wales made annual returns to the Stamp Office of their proprietors or shareholders. These returns, registered in March 1838, from the 103 banks then in existence, contain the full names and addresses of about 30,000 shareholders.

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Proprietors of Coventry Union Banking Company
 (1838)
Shareholders of the South Lancashire Bank (1838)
The provincial banks of England and Wales made annual returns to the Stamp Office of their proprietors or shareholders. These returns, registered in March 1838, from the 103 banks then in existence, contain the full names and addresses of nearly 30,000 shareholders.

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Shareholders of the South Lancashire Bank
 (1838)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: St Olave's (Surrey) (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: St Olave's (Surrey)
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Whitby (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Whitby
 (1861)
Boys entering Cheltenham College (1862)
Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).

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Boys entering Cheltenham College 
 (1862)
Civil Service Appointments (1862)
The Civil Service Commission published an annual list of all persons who had obtained certificates of qualification for appointment in the various public departments. The list gives full name (surname first); department (such as Post Office, or Inland Revenue); situation (such as Letter-carrier, or Clerk); and date of certificate. Candidates whose names are preceded by a dagger obtained appointments as the result of competition; a double dagger indicates open competition. Those whose names are preceded by an asterisk obtained honorary additions to their certificates either for proficiency in extra subjects chosen by themselves, or for marked proficiency in the prescribed subjects. Then follows a further list of these candidates who had obtained Honorary Additions to their Certificates in this way: giving name (surname and initials); position in the service (department and situation); subjects for which honorary additions were made; and 'extent of knowledge displayed' (such as Creditable, Fair, or Very Creditable). 1 January to 31 December 1862.

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Civil Service Appointments
 (1862)
Unclaimed Money and Property (1870)
Gun & Co. of 6 Prince of Wales' Road, London, in about 1870 published this fourth 'List of Next of Kin & Heirs, &c., who have been Advertised for in the English, Irish, Scotch, United States of America, Canadian, Australian, East and West Indian, and other Newspapers, since 1704. Money & Property to the value of many Millions Sterling want Claimants'. The list of 4,128 names gives surname, christian name, and, occasionally, locality. Copies of the actual advertisements were furnished to enquirers by the company at a cost of six shillings.

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Unclaimed Money and Property
 (1870)
Boys entering Clifton College (1872)
Clifton College near Bristol was established in 1862. This edition of the Clifton College Annals and Register for the Old Cliftonian Society by F. Borwick was published in 1925. Boys are listed alphabetically by term of entry, with full names, surname first, in bold. Father's (or widowed mother's) name is given (surname and initials) in capitals, and address. Then there is the name of the house (N. T., North Town; S. H., School House; S. T., South Town), first and last forms, distinctions in school work and games, and month of leaving. Where known, the editor then gave a career summary with month of death; or, if still living, address as in 1925 (in italics).

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Boys entering Clifton College
 (1872)
London Joint Stock Bank Shareholders (1873)
Copy of the return by the London Joint Stock Bank to the Inland Revenue listing the 'persons of whom the Company or partnership consists', pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation (often not stated).

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London Joint Stock Bank Shareholders
 (1873)
Chartered Electrical Engineers (A. M. I. E. E.) (1939)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871 under the name of The Society of Telegraph Engineers, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. The list of members, corrected to 1 September 1939, gives the names and addresses of the various grades of members. Members (M. I. E. E.) and Associate Members (A. M. I. E. E.) were entitled to describe themselves as Chartered Electrical Engineers. Then there are the Associates (Associate I. E. E.), Companions (Companion I. E. E.), Graduates (Graduate I. E. E.) and Students (Student I. E. E.). The names are given in bold, surname first; before each name is the year of attaining that grade; and for the higher grades the year of each lower grade is also given, e. g. (G. 1931).

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Chartered Electrical Engineers (A. M. I. E. E.)
 (1939)
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