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Donoghoe Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'donoghoe'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland (1679-1681)
This correspondence deals with a large variety of personal and public affairs in Ireland and England.

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Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland
 (1679-1681)
Traders and professionals in London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet of Businesses, Professions, &c.': coverage is good; about 30,000 individuals are recorded.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1805)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesPrisoners in the House of Correction at Westminster (1851)
The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The House of Correction of the City of Westminster was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Stephen's; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were 21 officers, 8 members of their families, and 6 servants; the institution held 737 prisoners - 245 men and 492 women. HO 107/1480

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Prisoners in the House of Correction at Westminster
 (1851)
British soldiers wounded at Inkerman (1854)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. In the battle of Inkerman, of November 1854, the Russian troops made an ultimately unsuccessful attack on the allied army. In December the War Office issued lists of soldiers killed and wounded at Inkerman: there are separate returns for 2 to 6 November, 7 to 20 November, and 21 to 26 November, as well as one for soldiers missing, and one for members of the Naval Brigade killed and wounded. This is the list of British soldiers wounded at Inkerman 2 to 6 November 1854.

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British soldiers wounded at Inkerman
 (1854)
Soldiers Wounded in the Battle of Alma: 19th Regiment of Foot (1854)
The commander of the British forces transmitted to the Secretary-at-War this return of casualties among non-commissioned officers and men sustained at and after the battle of Alma, 20 September 1854. This was the opening battle of the Crimean War, in which British forces seized the heights above the river Alma. The returns include those killed and wounded in the battle; missing; dead of wounds, and since dead, to 3 October 1854.

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Soldiers Wounded in the Battle of Alma: 19th Regiment of Foot
 (1854)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot, based at Cork, embarked for India in September 1858, and was transferred to China in 1860; moved to South Africa in 1865, and returned to England in 1869. The regiment took part in the capture of Pekin.

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British infantry fighting in China
 (1860)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the 73rd regiment of Foot (1860-1870)
The 73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot embarked for the Cape of Good Hope in 1845, was transferred to India, and in 1860 was serving at Dinapore: the regimental depot was at Chatham. Each year just a handful of outstanding soldiers of the regiment were chosen for good conduct medals and gratuities: these are listed here. There were two lists, one for men recommended for the Good Conduct Medal without a gratuity, and one for gratuities - £5 to a private, £10 to a corporal, and £15 to a serjeant. Both lists are indexed here, and each gives rank, name, regimental number, date of recommendation and date of issue. (The sample scan is from the 105th foot)

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Outstanding soldiers of the 73rd regiment of Foot
 (1860-1870)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the 87th regiment of Foot (1860-1870)
The 87th Regiment of Foot (Royal Irish Fusiliers) embarked for Bengal in 1849, and in 1860 was transferred from India into China. It returned home in 1861: the regimental depot was at Buttevant in Ireland. In 1866 the regiment was sent to Gibraltar, and in 1868 on to Malta. Each year just a handful of outstanding soldiers of the regiment were chosen for good conduct medals and gratuities: these are listed here. There were two lists, one for men recommended for the Good Conduct Medal without a gratuity, and one for gratuities - £5 to a private, £10 to a corporal, and £15 to a serjeant. Both lists are indexed here, and each gives rank, name, regimental number, date of recommendation and date of issue. (The sample scan is from the 105th foot)

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Outstanding soldiers of the 87th regiment of Foot
 (1860-1870)
Infants in Loughrea Workhouse, County Galway (1872)
Return, “with Christian and Surname of each, of Infants Born in Irish Workhouses, or Admitted thereto when Healthy under Twelve Months Old, and attempted to be Reared therein during the Years 1872 to 1874, showing what has since become of them”. The returns from each poor law union workhouse give: Christian and Surname of Infant Born in the Workhouse, or Admitted Healthy, under Twelve Months; Year; and whether discharged, healthy, in hospital, or dead.

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Infants in Loughrea Workhouse, County Galway
 (1872)
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