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Donnolly Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'donnolly'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 27 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Treasury Books (1693-1696)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, from January 1693 to March 1696. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors. The calendar was prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty's Treasury and published in 1935, from letters patent, privy seals, royal sign manuals and warrants, treasury warrants, commissions, orders, letters, memorials, reports and other entries, all not of the nature of Treasury Minutes.

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Treasury Books
 (1693-1696)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1701-1753)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1755 to 1833 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1701-1753)
Bankrupts (1801)
Bankrupts in England and Wales listed in a supplement to the European Magazine

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Bankrupts
 (1801)
Irish Insolvents (1829)
Insolvency notices for Ireland: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links, especially for emigrants

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Irish Insolvents
 (1829)
Masters of British Merchantmen (1834)
Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping was established in 1834, following the demise of two earlier societies for registering shipping in Britain. The new register in 1834 was created from an alphabetical list of British ships with no more detail than name, master's name, tonnage, and port to which they belonged. Lloyd's insurance syndicate provided 1000 for the establishment of a new system of surveyors, and as the year progressed many of the entries in the register were then annotated with additional information - type of vessel (Bk, barque; Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; Lr, lugger; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow; Yt, yacht), place and year of build, owners, destined voyage, and classification of the vessel and its stores, with the month (indicated by the final number in the last column) of inspection. Underneath each of these amended entries details were given of construction and repair, with year - s., sheathed; d., doubled; C., coppered; I. B., iron bolts; s. M., sheathed with marine metal; s. Y. M., sheathed with yellow metal; F., felt; PH., patent hair; Cl., clincher; len., lengthened; lrp., large repairs; trp., thorough repairs; ND., new deck; M. TSds., new top-sides; W. C., wales cased; NW., new wales; Srprs, some repairs - and, in italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; Bh, beech; C., cedar; E., elm; F., fir; G., gum; Ght., greenheart; Hk., hackmatack; L., locust; L. O., live oak; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; R. P., red pine; Y. P., yellow pine; S., spruce; T., teak; W. O., white oak. The sample scan is from the main list. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. This is the index to masters in the main list. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. These new masters are also included in this index.

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Masters of British Merchantmen
 (1834)
Insolvents (1842)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1842)
Soldiers Wounded in the Battle of Alma: 7th Royal Fusiliers (1854)
The commander of the British forces transmitted to the Secretary-at-War this return of casualties among non-commissioned officers and men sustained at and after the battle of Alma, 20 September 1854. This was the opening battle of the Crimean War, in which British forces seized the heights above the river Alma. The returns include those killed and wounded in the battle; missing; dead of wounds, and since dead, to 3 October 1854.

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Soldiers Wounded in the Battle of Alma: 7th Royal Fusiliers
 (1854)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1856-1858)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 59th (The 2nd Nottinghamshire) Regiment of Foot, based at Athlone, embarked from Ireland to Hong Kong 12 June 1849, and remained in China until 1858, not returning to Britain until 1865. The regiment took part in the capture of Canton.

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British infantry fighting in China
 (1856-1858)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Imperieuse (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged in 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Taku Forts 1860 clasp, for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and the Pekin clasp, for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Imperieuse
 (1860)
National ArchivesMen of the 57th Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War (1860-1870)
New Zealand War Medal roll for the 57th (The West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot: for service in the New Zealand campaign 1863 to 1867: the rolls were compiled following a general order in 1869 and the medals were distributed in 1870. The regiment had been serving at Poonah in India, and was moved to New Zealand in November 1860; the men returned to England in April 1867.

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Men of the 57th Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War
 (1860-1870)
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