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Donagan Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'donagan'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 15 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Insolvents in England and Wales (1845)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of insolvencies and stages in the process whereby the insolvents petitioned for release from debtors' prison. The insolvent is generally referred to by name (surname first), address and trade. This is the index to the names of the insolvents, from the issues from January to December 1845.

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Insolvents in England and Wales
 (1845)
Pupil Teachers in Middlesex: Boys (1851)
The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).

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Pupil Teachers in Middlesex: Boys
 (1851)
Traders and professionals in London (1851)
The Post Office London Directory for 1851 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording about 80,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1851)
Bankrupts' Estates (1854)
Transfers of bankrupts' estates in England and Wales to assignees

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Bankrupts' Estates
 (1854)
Insolvents (1854)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1854)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1855)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders: in England and Wales

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1855)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Retribution in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Retribution, a 28-gun steam frigate, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Retribution in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
Traders and professionals in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording over 100,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 67th (The South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot, based at Athlone, embarked for India 18 September 1858, and was transferred to China in 1859, taking part in the capture of the Taku Forts and Pekin, and the operations against the Taiping rebels in 1862 to 1863: the right wing was moved to Japan in 1864 for the occupation of Yokohama. The regiment returned to the Cape of Good Hope in 1865, and back to Ireland in 1866.

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British infantry fighting in China
 (1856-1860)
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