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Demay Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'demay'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1577-1700)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1588 to 1754 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1577-1700)
Inhabitants of the City of London (1780)
In August 1780 this loyal petition was made to king George III, subscribed by 2800 'Liverymen, Freemen, and Others, Inhabitants of the City of London', expressing grateful thanks 'for that Protection, which, by the Wisdom, Vigilance, and Activity of your Majesty in Council, was so seasonably given to us, at a Time when our Lives, Property, and every Thing dear to us, were in such imminent Danger, from the Violence of the most outrageous Banditti that ever existed.' This refers to the Gordon Riots, caused by a bill which Parliament introduced in 1778 to repeal certain harsh laws against Roman Catholics: in June 1780 a mob protesting against this repeal assembled in London, forced its way into the House of Commons, attacked Newgate prison releasing many prisoners, and destroyed a great deal of property, until dispersed by the military.

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Inhabitants of the City of London
 (1780)
Traders and Merchants in London (1791)
The Universal British Directory was published in five volumes, starting in 1791. The professions included in the London section are very diverse: the addresses are mostly from central London. Some are marked 'F. M.', meaning Freeholder of Middlesex.

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Traders and Merchants in London
 (1791)
Bankrupts (1786-1806)
William Smith's abstracts of bankrupts, dividends and certificates for England and Wales from 1786 to June 1806. Bankruptcy causes abrupt changes in people's lives, and is often the reason for someone appearing suddenly in a different location or in a different occupation.

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Bankrupts
 (1786-1806)
London Traders (1814)
The fifteenth edition of The Post-Office Annual Directory includes this 'List of More than 17,000 Merchants, Traders, &c. of London, and Parts Adjacent', arranged alphabetically by surname, with trade in italics, and address.

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London Traders
 (1814)
Officers of the British Army (1832)
The annual Army List, published By Authority, first lists officers of the rank of major and above, by rank, and with dates of appointment to each successive higher rank; holders of crosses, crosses with clasps (with number of clasps indicated), medals, medals with clasps (with number of clasps indicated) are marked as such; and an ornate W indicates those officers actually present in any of the actions of 16, 17 or 18 June 1815 and therefore awarded the Waterloo Medal. For each officer in this section, the final column notes his then present or immediately former regiment and/or office, if any. Next, all the officers of the army are listed, down to the rank of ensign, by regiment or corps, giving rank, name, date of rank in the regiment, and date of rank in the army, with occasional further notes. Again, holders of medals are duly noted, as in the first list. For each regiment the paymaster, adjutant, quartermaster, surgeon and assistant surgeons are named, as well as the civilian agent; and the regimental motto, battle honours, and colours of the facings and lace of the dress uniform are stated. After the British regiments of the line, the officers of the West India infantry, the Ceylon rifles, the Royal African Colonial Corps, the Cape Mounted Riflemen, the Royal Newfoundland Veterans, and the Royal Malta Fencibles are given; then the officers of the garrisons and other military establishments in Great Britain, Ireland, North America and Gibraltar (with Malta); the Royal Artillery; Commissariat Department; Medical Department; Chaplains' Department; officers retained on full pay; officers on British half pay; and officers on Foreign half pay (including the German Legion, the Brunswick Cavalry, the Brunswick Infantry, Chasseurs Brittaniques, Corsican Rangers, Dillon's Regiment, the Greek Light Infantry, Malta Regiment, Meuron's Regiment, Roll's Regiment, Sicilian Regiment, Watteville's Regiment, and the York Light Infantry Volunteers).

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Officers of the British Army
 (1832)
Patentees of New Inventions (1854)
Abstracts of British patents for new inventions applied for and granted from 1 January to 31 December 1854: giving date, name and address, and short description of the invention. It is then stated whether 'Letters patent sealed' or 'Provisional protection only'.

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Patentees of New Inventions
 (1854)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
Aliens wanted by the British police (1923)
The Police Gazette was published by Authority by the London Metropolitan Police, and circulated, as confidential, to the police forces throughout Britain and Ireland. The contents were based on the information routinely submitted to the Criminal Record Office. One of the regular features was a list of Aliens Whose Whereabouts Are Sought. The details given are full name (surname in bold); sex, age, nationality, and last known address, and date when last heard of. There then follows the name of the police authority (in bold) seeking to make contact. In most cases an arrest was not sought, merely the establishing of present whereabouts. Variations of surname spelling and aliases are noted in the descriptions, and these variants and aliases have also been indexed.

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Aliens wanted by the British police 
 (1923)
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