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Delamare Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'delamare'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 56 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral (1170-1179)
The Liber A or Pilosus of St Paul's cathedral, London, was initiated in 1241 as an attempt at copying all the charters, chirographs and other diverse writings found in the treasury of the church; after that original project was abandoned, the codex came to be used as a general register or cartulary. The first portion was edited for the Royal Historical Society by Marion Gibbs and printed in 1939. Where the original charters also survived, or a better text was found in Liber L, she used these superior sources. Liber A never became a complete register of the cathedral's charters; nor are the charters it contains necessarily the most important, nor were they grouped chronologically or geographically. The text remains as a record of part of the great landed wealth of the church in London and nearby. The persons that appear are the grantors, justices, those named in the descriptions of property, and the witnesses.

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Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral
 (1170-1179)
Feet of Fines at Westminster: Yorkshire Cases (1198)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land. This transcript of the feet of fines of the '9th' year of the reign of king Richard I (3 September 1197 to 2 September 1198) was published by the Pipe Roll Society in 1898. The form of these proceedings is fairly standard: giving the date, the place of the hearing, and the names of the justices; the names of the plaintiffs (petentes) and defendants (tenentes) and a brief description of the land in question; the outcome of the case is a quitclaim by one party to the other, with a payment of a suitable sum. These cases were heard at Westminster: the original roll misdates the fines in the justices' eyre to the 9th rather than the 10th year of the reign, and this error may also relate to those at Westminster. In the printed copy the dates given in the margin may be 1197 where they should read 1198, or 1198 where they should read 1199, and may also be 1 or more days out.

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Feet of Fines at Westminster: Yorkshire Cases
 (1198)
Liberate Rolls (1200-1211)
The chancery liberate rolls of the 2nd, 3rd and 5th years of the reign of king John (who came to the throne 27 May 1199) record the details of payments and allowances issued out of the Court of Chancery under the Great Seal of England, and were directed to the Treasurer. The rolls were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy and printed by the Record Commission in 1844. Included in the volume is a transcript of a Praestita Roll (on which were entered the sums of money which issued out of the treasuries by way of imprest, advance or accommodation) of the 12th year of king John and a Misae Roll (detailing the daily expenses of his court) of the 11th year. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1200-1211)
Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral (1210-1219)
The Liber A or Pilosus of St Paul's cathedral, London, was initiated in 1241 as an attempt at copying all the charters, chirographs and other diverse writings found in the treasury of the church; after that original project was abandoned, the codex came to be used as a general register or cartulary. The first portion was edited for the Royal Historical Society by Marion Gibbs and printed in 1939. Where the original charters also survived, or a better text was found in Liber L, she used these superior sources. Liber A never became a complete register of the cathedral's charters; nor are the charters it contains necessarily the most important, nor were they grouped chronologically or geographically. The text remains as a record of part of the great landed wealth of the church in London and nearby. The persons that appear are the grantors, justices, those named in the descriptions of property, and the witnesses.

DELAMARE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral
 (1210-1219)
Payments by the English crown (1370)
The Exitus or Issue Roll of the Exchequer, compiled by the Clerk of the Pell, recorded all issues or payments made by the English crown: presents of plate and jewellery to foreign nobility; household payments to officers and servants; wardrobe payments; alms; payments for the upkeep of royal palaces, manors, residences and chapels; repayments of loans to the king; payments to messengers and couriers; wages of mercenaries; the upkeep of the navy; ransoming of hostages; maintenance of castles, forts, garrisons and fortifications; salaries of judges and other officers of the courts of Chancery, Exchequer, King's Bench and Common Pleas; as well as a host of miscellaneous other items. This is a translation of the text of the roll for the 44th year of the reign of king Edward III, when Thomas de Brantingham, Bishop of Exeter, was Lord High Treasurer of England.

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Payments by the English crown
 (1370)
English knights at Agincourt (1415)
At the battle of Agincourt, 25 October 1415, English forces under king Henry V inflicted a signal defeat on the French forces led by the Constable D'Albret. The English are said to have numbered about 15,000 men. This list of 'The Names of the Dukes, Erles, Barons, Knights, Esquires, Serviteurs and others that wer withe the Excellent Prince King Henry the Fifte at the Battell of Agincourt' is of the leaders of the English forces and of the knights (lances) in their retinues: of the archers, for which the battle is famous, hardly a handful are named. Nicholas Harris Nicolas, the antiquarian, found this list accidentally among the manuscripts in the British Museum, and published it, with an extensive account of the battle, in 1827.

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English knights at Agincourt
 (1415)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1413-1416)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign of king Henry V (21 March 1413 to 20 March 1416) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. C. Fowler, and published in 1910. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. The commissions of the peace issued for the English towns and counties and entered on the rolls, being largely repetitive, have been consolidated in a single appendix.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1413-1416)
Worcestershire landowners (1428)
An inquiry was held at Worcester 30 September 1428 into the ownership of the knight's fees from each hundred in the county (but not the city) of Worcester. The jurors based their findings on a previous inquiry a few years earlier, so that for each fee or portion of a fee the name of the previous freeholder is also given. This inquiry was used as the basis for the raising of a subsidy from the laity, taxed at 6s 8d per owner of an entire knight's fee, 1s 8d for a quarter of a knight's fee, smaller fractions being exempt; in addition, the population of each parish was taxed by a formula based on earlier taxations dating back to 1290; but the taxation of the parishes was levied by the parishes themselves, so there is no return of individual householders. The names that appear in these records (the inquiry and the subsequent lay subsidy roll) are thus those of the major freeholders, the jurors, assessors and collectors. The rolls were edited and translated by John Amphlett for the Worcestershire Historical Society and printed in 1902.

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Worcestershire landowners
 (1428)
Close Rolls (1429-1435)
The close rolls of the 8th to 13th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France. Also included is the Exchange Roll of 1424 to 1434, of licences to transmit sums of money out of the realm.

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Close Rolls
 (1429-1435)
Somerset Feet of Fines (1400-1484)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Somerset. These abstracts were prepared by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society and published in 1906. They cover material for the county from the reigns of Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VI, Edward IV and Richard III.

DELAMARE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Somerset Feet of Fines
 (1400-1484)
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