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Darragh Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'darragh'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 30 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Masters of Merchantmen (1785)
The Daily Universal Register of April 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Plymouth, Whitby, Cowes, Falmouth, Bristol and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Creek(e), in the Downs, off the Lizard, off Scilly, off the Start, in Studland Bay, off Whitby, off the Wight, at Aberdeen, Alicante, Ancona, Antigua, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Barcelona, Bayonne, Belfast, Bombay, Bonny, Bordeaux, Brighthelmstone (Brighton), Bristol, Cadiz, Carlingford, Cartagena, Charlestown, Cork, Cowes, Cuxhaven, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Dunkirk, Falmouth, Galway, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guernsey, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Hamburg, Havre de Grace, Hull, Jersey, Kinsale, Lancaster, Leghorn, Limerick, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, Lochryan, Malaga, Marseilles, Montserrat, Nantes, New Providence (Bahamas), New York, Newry, Oporto, Ostend, Penzance, Plymouth, Poole, Portsmouth, Rotterdam, St Eustatia, St John's, St Kitts, St Vincents, Scarborough, Scilly, Seville, Southampton, Stangate Creek, Tenerife, Texel, Tobago, Venice, Waterford, Weymouth, Whitehaven, and in 'Africa', Georgia, Jamaica, Maryland, North Carolina, Philadelphia, South Carolina and Virginia; and Coast Lists made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1785)
Wesleyan Methodist preachers' widows (1810-1811)
The Wesleyan Methodist church's Merciful Fund provided annuities for preachers' widows, as well as other payments to retired clergy, widows and other dependants in need. These are listed in the annual minutes. Particularly useful is the fact that, after a widow remarried, her first married surname and her new surname were both given.

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Wesleyan Methodist preachers' widows
 (1810-1811)
Irish Insolvents (1828)
Insolvency notices for Ireland: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links, especially for emigrants

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Irish Insolvents
 (1828)
Revenue Coast Guard (1830-1831)
Appointments 11 August 1830 to 11 August 1831: 1a. Return of all persons appointed to situations in the department of the Excise, and of persons nominated as expectants to receive instructions to qualify them to become officers: giving date of appointment or nomination; name; station; salary and emolument. 1b. Return of all persons re-appointed to situations in the Excise: giving name; station in which dropped; salary and emoluments; when and to what station re-appointed; salary and emoluments. This return is split into England, Scotland and Ireland. 2. Return of the different persons appointed to situations in the departments of the Customs: stating port; office; name of officer; when admitted; and salary and emoluments. 3. This return of men appointed to situations in the Revenue Coast Guard: with date of appointment; name; rank; salary; and emoluments.

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Revenue Coast Guard
 (1830-1831)
Irish Insolvents (1838)
Insolvency notices for Ireland: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links, especially for emigrants

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Irish Insolvents
 (1838)
Students entering the Albert National Agricultural Training Institution, Dublin (1849)
This register of internal students gives full name; date of entry; date of leaving; time spent at the institution (in years and months); and, particularly interesting, 'destination of leaving' - such as 'Teacher in Tullamore Workhouse School', 'Emigrated to America', 'Agriculturist at Dunmanway'.

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Students entering the Albert National Agricultural Training Institution, Dublin
 (1849)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Trafalgar in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Trafalgar, a 120-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Trafalgar in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Acorn (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged from 1856 to 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Fatshan clasp, for being actually present during the successful operations against the Chinese war junks in the Escapo creek, which commenced 25 May and were finally closed at Fatshan 1 June 1857; and the Canton clasp, for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Acorn
 (1856-1860)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 1st battalion, the 2nd (The Queen's Royal) Regiment of Foot, based at Walmer, embarked for the Cape of Good Hope 24 June 1851. The battalion took part in the capture of the Taku Forts and in that of Pekin.

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British infantry fighting in China
 (1860)
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