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Curton Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'curton'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Curia Regis Rolls (1196-1201)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1196-1201)
Liberate Rolls (1200-1211)
The chancery liberate rolls of the 2nd, 3rd and 5th years of the reign of king John (who came to the throne 27 May 1199) record the details of payments and allowances issued out of the Court of Chancery under the Great Seal of England, and were directed to the Treasurer. The rolls were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy and printed by the Record Commission in 1844. Included in the volume is a transcript of a Praestita Roll (on which were entered the sums of money which issued out of the treasuries by way of imprest, advance or accommodation) of the 12th year of king John and a Misae Roll (detailing the daily expenses of his court) of the 11th year. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1200-1211)
Curia Regis Rolls (1210-1212)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1210-1212)
Oblata or Fine Rolls (1200-1216)
All the surviving oblata or fine rolls of the reign of king John were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy and printed by the Commissioners of the Public Records in 1835. These are the oblata rolls of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign, and the fine rolls of the 6th, 7th, 9th, 15th, 16th and 17th years. These rolls contain notices of the oblations or fines offered to the Crown to procure grants and confirmations of liberties and franchises of markets, fairs, parks and free warren; for exemption from tolls, pontage, passage and murage; to obtain justice and right; to stop, delay or expedite pleas, trials and judgments; and to remove suits and processes from inferior tribunals into the King's Court. Fines were also extracted for licence to trade, or permission to exercise commerce or industry of any kind, and to have the aid, protection, or goodwill of the King; to mitigate his anger or abate his displeasure; to be exempted from knighthood either for a term or for ever, and from attending the King in his foreign expeditions; they were also demanded for seisin or restitution of ancestral lands or chattels; for allowing delinquents to be replevied or bailed; for acquittal of murder; and for pardon of trespasses and misdemeanours; for the 'year and a day' of the lands and goods of felons and fugitives. Almost all entries have the county in question indicated in the left hand margin.

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Oblata or Fine Rolls
 (1200-1216)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1793)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1793)
National ArchivesApprentices and clerks (1802)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 June to 31 December 1802. IR 1/39

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Apprentices and clerks
 (1802)
Prisoners dying in Millbank Prison (1846)
The new prison at Millbank was used as a holding centre for convicts destined for the hulks: 'few of the adult convicts remain for a longer period than three months; and of those who remain for a longer period, the most part are criminals of the worst description, who are awaiting embarkation for their final destination in Norfolk Island.' The report of the commissioners appointed to inquire into the management of the prison includes a return of prisoners who died in the prison from 5 September 1843 to 21 June 1846, giving: Name; Age; Date of Reception; Date of Death; Cause of Death; State of Health when received; Whether an Inquest was held.

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Prisoners dying in Millbank Prison
 (1846)
National ArchivesPrisoners in the House of Correction at Westminster (1851)
The 1851 census enumerators' books for the mass of the population record the information as in this sample scan. However, there were also separate books for the major public institutions. The instructions for the first column (Name and Surname of each Person who abode in the Institution on the Night of the 30th March, 1851) run: "Write after the Name of the Master or Head of the Institution the Names of his Wife, Children, other Relatives, and Servants; then the Names of the Officers, their Families, and Servants. Commence the list of Inmates for which the Institution is provided on another page." For the second column (Position in the Institution): "State whether the person is the Head, or an Officer or Servant, or the Wife, Son, Daughter, or other relative of such Officer or Servant. If an Inmate, state whether patient, soldier, scholar, &c." For the third column (Condition): "Write 'Married,' 'Widower,' 'Widow,' or 'Unmarried,' against the Names of all Persons except Young Children." For the fourth column (Age (last Birthday)): "For Infants under One Year state the Age in Months, writing 'Under 1 Month,' '1 Month,' '2 Months,' &c." For the fifth column (Rank, Profession or Occupation): "State here the profession, or what is believed to have been the ordinary occupation of the Inmate before admission into the Institution. Carefully distinguish in this column the different kinds of 'laborers,' and those who have been masters in trade from others." For the sixth column (Where Born): "Opposite the Names of those born in England, Scotland, or Ireland write the County, and Town or Parish. If born in the British Colonies, the East Indies, or in Foreign Parts, state the Country; in the last case, if a British Subject, add 'British Subject.'" For the seventh column (Whether Blind, or Deaf-and-Dumb): "Write 'Deaf-and-Dumb,' or 'Blind,' opposite the Name of the Person.'" The House of Correction of the City of Westminster was in the parish of St Margaret and the ecclesiastical district of St Stephen's; in Westminster superintendent registrar's district, and St Margaret registrar's district. There were 21 officers, 8 members of their families, and 6 servants; the institution held 737 prisoners - 245 men and 492 women. HO 107/1480

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Prisoners in the House of Correction at Westminster
 (1851)
Traders and professionals in London (1851)
The Post Office London Directory for 1851 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording about 80,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1851)
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