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Critten Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'critten'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 14 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1718)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1718)
National ArchivesMasters of clerks and apprentices (1774)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1774.

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Masters of clerks and apprentices
 (1774)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Suffolk (1792)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/66

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Apprentices registered in Suffolk
 (1792)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Suffolk (1794)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/67

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Masters of apprentices registered in Suffolk
 (1794)
Bankrupts (1808-1810)
William Smith's abstracts of bankruptcies for England and Wales from 1 January 1808 to 1 August 1810. Bankruptcy causes abrupt changes in people's lives, and is often the reason for someone appearing suddenly in a different location or in a different occupation.

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Bankrupts
 (1808-1810)
Bankrupts and solicitors (1810)
English bankrupts and their solicitors, as reported in the European Magazine. July to December 1810.

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Bankrupts and solicitors
 (1810)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Pupil Teachers in Suffolk: Girls (1851)
The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).

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Pupil Teachers in Suffolk: Girls
 (1851)
Insolvents (1858)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1858)
Unclaimed Naval Prize Money (1855-1902)
Various prize moneys were awarded to officers and men who served on board her Majesty's ships. For one reason or another a substantial number of these prizes, from as little as a shilling or two to as much as many pounds, remained undistributed by 1902, when this comprehensive list of the unclaimed moneys was printed: it lists unclaimed shares of prize money, slave and pirate bounties, salvage awards, parliamentary grants, gratuities and other moneys distributed by the Admiralty 1855 to 1902, but which omits moneys for service on the China Station during the war of 1856 to 1880, and special gratuities for service in Egypt (1882), Soudan (1884) and Soudan and Nile Expedition (1884-1885), for which there are separate indexes. In each case the sailor's name is given first (surname, then christian name or initials); rank or rating; ship in which serving at time of capture or award; and the amount due.

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Unclaimed Naval Prize Money
 (1855-1902)
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