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Crips Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'crips'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 90 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Fine Rolls (1246-1272)
The fine rolls of the 31st to 57th years of the reign of king Henry III record part of the government administration in England. These excerpts from the rolls list in transcript applications by plaintiffs for various writs (such as 'ad terminum' and 'pone') and for assizes to be held by the justices in eyre to look into their grievances. A fine of half a mark (6s 8d) or a mark (13s 4d) was usually levied; the cases are normally identified by county, and record that the appropriate sheriff had been notified. There are also more extensive records, in which more detail is given. The excerpts were made by the Record Commission and printed in 1836.

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Fine Rolls
 (1246-1272)
Cheshire Court Rolls (1259-1290)
Civil and criminal cases for most of Cheshire were handled by the county courts. Here we have the county court rolls for November 1259 to August 1260, December 1281 to September 1282, and December 1286 to September 1289. The city of Chester exercised its own jurisdiction, and here we have crown pleas and presentments from 1287 to 1297. The royal manor of Macclesfield in the east of the county had three independent jurisdictions - the hundred, forest and borough. Royal justices in eyre dealt with civil and criminal cases from the hundred and forest during their yearly visits, and here we have records from 1284 to 1290. Also covered by this index is an Inquest of Service in Time of War in Wales of 1288, listing knight's fees in the county.

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Cheshire Court Rolls
 (1259-1290)
Inhabitants of London (1275-1298)
Liber Horn or the Lesser Black Book, now known as Letter Book A of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration. The letter books are so called because they were lettered from A to Z and from AA to ZZ, not because they were books of letters. Letter Book A was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe for the corporation and printed in 1899.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1275-1298)
Chancery Warrants (1244-1326)
Warrants were issued by the kings of England to the royal chancery: most of these warrants led to further proceedings which are recorded on the Charter Rolls, Patent Rolls, Fine Rolls, Close Rolls or the Inquisitions: but archivists have identified a large number of warrants for which there are no such equivalent records, and those for the reigns of Edward I and Edward II are gathered here. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but with occasional items referring to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Chancery Warrants
 (1244-1326)
Deeds from Bath in Somerset (1330-1339)
More than 500 mediaeval deeds survived in the muniment chest of Bath in Somerset, almost all dealing with the transfers of small plots of land in the city. Each names the grantor and grantee, describes the land, and is witnessed by other citizens. This printed edition was prepared by the Reverend C. W. Shickle, Master of St John's Hospital in Bath. Where (as in many cases) the earliest deeds were undated, he was able to assign periods to each on the basis of style and content, particularly the names of witnesses.

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Deeds from Bath in Somerset
 (1330-1339)
Inhabitants of London (1337-1352)
Letter Book F of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c. The book includes an assessment of the inhabitants in 1346 (pages 143 to 149) listing many householders; a list of mayors and sheriffs from 1189 to 1548 (276-303), and records of the city's use of infangthef (summary execution of certain criminals) down to 1409. The text was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe and printed by order of the Corporation of the City of London in 1904.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1337-1352)
London, Essex and Hertfordshire clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1361-1374)
Ordinations to first tonsure, acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop Simon de Sudbury of London. London diocese covered Middlesex, Essex and part of Hertfordshire; the ordinations also attracted many persons from distant dioceses bearing letters dimissory from their ordinaries, and these are duly noted in the text. Many of these clerks would not go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars ('religious') are listed separately, and the lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests are also separated into beneficed and not beneficed (or 'not promoted'). The acolyte lists are unusual in giving a parish or diocese of origin.

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London, Essex and Hertfordshire clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1361-1374)
Close Rolls (1429-1435)
The close rolls of the 8th to 13th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France. Also included is the Exchange Roll of 1424 to 1434, of licences to transmit sums of money out of the realm.

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Close Rolls
 (1429-1435)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1542-1547)
The Privy Council of Henry VIII was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1542-1547)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1550-1552)
The Privy Council of Edward VI was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1550-1552)
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