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Courcey Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'courcey'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1484-1492)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of pope Innocent VIII. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which most of the key government and ecclesiastical records of this period are lost. Innocent VIII was consecrated and crowned 12 September 1484 (the day from which his pontificate is dated) and died at Rome 25 July 1492. The extracts were made by J. A. Twemlow from Vatican Regesta dclxxxii to dcclxxi and Lateran Regesta dcccxxxviii to dcccxl.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1484-1492)
National ArchivesMarines on board H. M. S. Defence (1796-1798)
His Majesty's ship the Defence took part in the destruction of the French fleet in Aboukir Bay at the mouth of the Nile ('the Battle of the Nile') on the evening of the 1st and morning of the 2nd August 1798. This is the muster book for 1 July to 31 August 1798: being a continuation book in a series covering wages and victualling from October 1796, it also includes the names of some men who had died, deserted or been discharged from the ship from then to July 1798.

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Marines on board H. M. S. Defence
 (1796-1798)
Voters in the Parish of St James, Westminster (1837)
A poll was taken 26 July 1837 for the election of two members to represent the City of Westminster in Parliament. The candidates were Lieut.-Col. de Lacey Evans, John Temple Leader, and Gen. the Right Hon. sir George Murray, K. G. C. This poll book lists the electors with full name (surname first) and address (in italics), dashes indicating for whom they cast their votes. The names are listed alphabetically by first letter of surname, arranged in the eight parishes of Westminster, plus the extra-parochial Precincts of the Savoy.

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Voters in the Parish of St James, Westminster
 (1837)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1851)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad. July to December 1851

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1851)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Hannibal in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Hannibal, a 90-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site. This index also covers Mortar Boat No. 13, the Hannibal's tender.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Hannibal in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Terrible in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Terrible, a steam frigate, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Terrible in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
Residents of Surrey (1895)
Kelly's Directory of Surrey includes this alphabetical Court Directory, listing private residents in the county. In fact, this listing is a little more comprehensive than the main directory, in that it includes residents of some London suburbs that, although in the county of Surrey, are not included in the Surrey directory. Residents are listed surname first, then christian name or initials, and postal address.

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Residents of Surrey
 (1895)
Unclaimed Naval Prize Money (1855-1902)
Various prize moneys were awarded to officers and men who served on board her Majesty's ships. For one reason or another a substantial number of these prizes, from as little as a shilling or two to as much as many pounds, remained undistributed by 1902, when this comprehensive list of the unclaimed moneys was printed: it lists unclaimed shares of prize money, slave and pirate bounties, salvage awards, parliamentary grants, gratuities and other moneys distributed by the Admiralty 1855 to 1902, but which omits moneys for service on the China Station during the war of 1856 to 1880, and special gratuities for service in Egypt (1882), Soudan (1884) and Soudan and Nile Expedition (1884-1885), for which there are separate indexes. In each case the sailor's name is given first (surname, then christian name or initials); rank or rating; ship in which serving at time of capture or award; and the amount due.

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Unclaimed Naval Prize Money
 (1855-1902)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1905)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This appendix to the list was issued in about 1905.

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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1905)
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