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Cons Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'cons'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Traders and professionals in London (1851)
The Post Office London Directory for 1851 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording about 80,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1851)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Tribune in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Tribune, a 30-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Tribune in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
Traders and professionals in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording over 100,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Furious (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged from 1856 to 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Canton clasp, for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; the Taku Forts 1858 clasp, for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; and the Taku Forts 1860 clasp, for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Furious
 (1856-1860)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: St Pancras Parish (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: St Pancras Parish
 (1861)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1882)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, July to September 1882

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1882)
Estates of the Deceased: London (1912)
Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.

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Estates of the Deceased: London
 (1912)
Imperial Service Medal (1931)
Awards by king George V of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

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Imperial Service Medal
 (1931)
Structural Engineers (M. I. STRUCT. E.) (1953)
The Institution of Structural Engineers was founded in 1908 and incorporated by royal charter in 1934. The institution had nine branches in Britain and Northern Ireland, and one in South Africa. The 1953 year book includes this list of members corrected to 1 August 1953, giving year of election to the various grades, surname (in bold), christian name, honours, address, and telephone number. 'Members shall be persons elected as such who, either (a) having attained the age of not less than thirty years and passed an examination qualifying for Associate-Membership and subsequent to this have been engaged for at least five years in a position of responsibility for the design or execution of important structural engineering work; or (b) having attained the age of not less than forty years and being engaged in the profession of structural engineering shall have had at least fifteen years' employment in positions of responsibility for the design or execution of important structural engineering work and shall have acquired a considerable degree of eminence as a structural engineer.'

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Structural Engineers (M. I. STRUCT. E.)
 (1953)
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