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Colville Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'colville'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 316 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Lancashire Assizes (1202-1285)
All the surviving records of the assizes held by the royal justices in eyre (itinerant) in Lancashire during this period were extracted by colonel John Parker and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society from 1904. The justices not only tried all civil actions outstanding on their advent, pleas of the crown and common pleas, but also interrogated the juries of each wapentake and borough as to the Capitula Itineries, the Articles of the Eyre, inquiring into the king's proprietary rights, escheats, wardships, and questions of maladministration. Only a dozen complete rolls survive for this period; but Appendix I (pp. 218-253) gathers together from the Patent Rolls of the reign of Henry III (1216-1272) a schedule of Lancashire assizes for which justices were assigned; and Appendix II (306-342) adds the fines and amercements before the justices during that reign, as recorded on the Pipe Rolls.

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Lancashire Assizes
 (1202-1285)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1275-1295)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1898. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1275-1295)
Pontefract Cartulary (1100-1300)
The Cluniac monastery of St John the Evangelist at Pontefract (Pomfret) in the West Riding of Yorkshire, was founded in the 11th century by Robert de Lascy. The grants of land made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which eventually came to Godfrey Wentworth of Woolley Park. This was edited by Richard Holmes and published by Yorkshire Archaeological Society in 1899 and 1902. The individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated: the numbering of the charters is modern, and amounts to 561. The cartulary itself contains 11 fasciculi, to which Holmes gave these section names - I. The Seigniorial Charters; II. The Ecclesiastical Charters; III. Royal Charters and Confirmations; IV. The Local Charters (Pontefract &c.); V. The Ledstone Charters; VI. The Ledsham Charters; VII. Miscellaneous Charters; VIII. The Peckfield and other Charters; IX. and X. Scarborough and other Charters; and XI. Leases to Tenants. Ledston(e), Ledsham and Peckfield are all close to Pontefract, as is most of the property.

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Pontefract Cartulary
 (1100-1300)
Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)
The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This first part contains the charters from folios 1 to 233, items I to DXCIII. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated.

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Guisborough Cartulary
 (1119-1300)
Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)
The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This second part contains the charters numbered DXCIV to MCLXXXIX. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated. The charters in this section are arranged by place, under the heads 'Normanby; Martona; Thornaby; Ugthorpe et Pecibiggyng; Levingtona; Jarum; Castle Levington; Kepwyck; Feyceby; Atona; Thresk; Neuton; Estona; Lackenby; Lyum; Cotum; Scheltona; Brottona; Moresom; Glasedale Daneby et Moresum; Kylton; Lofthus; Esingtona; Lyverton; Daneby; Glasdale; Uggethorpe; Percybyggyng; Sletholme; Scalynge; Redker; Merske; Hesele; Lunde super le Walde; Kirkburn; Rotsea; Bainton; Tibthorpe; Ingleby Arncliff; East Harlsey; Sawcock; Scarth; Stokesley; Kirkby-in-Cleveland; Battersby; Stainton-in-Cleveland; Maltby; Ayresome; York; Sinnington; Barningham and Newsham; Aylesby; Kelsterne; Bridekirk and Appleton; Aislaby; Hart and Hartlepool; Castle Eden; and Annandale'. Three further sections are added from other sources: 1. Documents connected with the burning of the priory church in 1289; 2. Extracts from the registers of the archbishops of York relating to the priory, 1238 to 1337; 3. A rent roll of the priory of about 1300 (pp. 412 to 450), giving many names of tenants.

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Guisborough Cartulary
 (1119-1300)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1294-1303)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1902. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c. The volume also includes two stray inquests, from 1245 and 1282.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1294-1303)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1298-1389)
'Cambridge Gild Records' was edited by Mary Bateson for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, and printed in 1903. Several important records for the town are brought together: minutes of the Gild of St Mary in the church of St Mary in the Market Place, 1298-1319 (pages 1-13); bede rolls of the same of around 1349 (14-25); minutes of the Gild of Corpus Christi in the church of St Bene't (26-62); returns for all the Cambridge gilds in 1389 (63-128); a calendar of deeds connected with the gilds of St Mary and Corpus Christi (129-150); and also a subsidy roll for the borough, listing householders in the 8th year of king Edward II (1314-1315) (151-157). The gild minutes include lists of persons entering the gild, usually paying a certain amount for alms and for wax for lights (candles). The bede rolls list prayers for the souls of the deceased, using the formula 'pro anima ..... (et ..... uxoris ejus)', 'for the soul of ..... (and of ..... his wife)'. Dates are not generally given, but most of the entries in these bede rolls are from 1349 to 1352.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1298-1389)
The English in France (1418-1419)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 6th year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1418 to 20 March 1419) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883.

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The English in France
 (1418-1419)
The English in France (1434)
King Henry VI of England (one of the grandsons of Charles VI of France) claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. Henry VI came to the throne only seven years after his father had trounced the French at Agincourt; but his cousin, Charles VII, who became king of France in the same year, spent his long reign rebutting the English king's claim to his throne by territorial reconquest and consolidation. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. As Henry VI's reign progressed, and the English grip on northern France loosened, the French Rolls also increasingly include entries concerning the ransoming of English prisoners.

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The English in France
 (1434)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1458-1471)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of popes Pius II and Paul II. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Many of the names in the text were clearly a puzzle to the scribes in Rome, and spelling of British and Irish placenames and surnames is chaotic.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1458-1471)
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