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Collyn Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'collyn'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 31 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1362-1404)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Urban V, Gregory XI, (Anti-Pope) Clement VII, Urban VI and Boniface IX, and the Lateran Regesta of Boniface IX. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Urban V was consecrated and crowned 6 November 1362 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); Gregory XI was crowned 5 January 1371; Clement VII 31 October 1378; Urban VI 18 April 1378; Boniface IX 9 November 1389 and died 1 October 1404. Until 1376 the papacy was in exile at Avignon. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss from Regesta ccxlv to cccxx and Lateran Regesta i to xliii, and published in 1902. Bliss remarked that 'although the writing of the Papal Registers of the 14th century is clearer than that of many contemporary English MSS., the entries in them were for the most part founded upon petitions or letters from different countries, and the scribes in the Papal Chancery must have experienced even greater difficulty in copying English proper names than English students experience nowadays in reading the early Chancery Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office. Not having local or personal knowledge, they constantly misread doubtful letters.'

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1362-1404)
Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire (1440-1441)
The Duchess of Norfolk allowed T. Walter Hall to examine the early archives of her Sheffield estates, and in 1926 he published a volume including abstracts (in translation) of the Sheffield manor court roll from October 1440 to September 1441. In this roll was also the Sheriff's tourn 18 April 1441 of the superior jurisdiction of Hallamshire, covering the sokes of Sheffield, Hannesworth, Bradfield, Southawe and Ecclesfield; and this is also printed. Hall found fragments of a Bradfield court roll of 1385; and devoted the latter half of his book to extracts from the Register of Copyholders' Surrenders, showing surrenders and admittances of copyhold tenants of the manor of Sheffield from 1403 to 1634; plus some miscellaneous deeds and documents relating to the manor and to Hallamshire. The index covers all these.

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Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire
 (1440-1441)
The English in France (1455)
King Henry VI of England (one of the grandsons of Charles VI of France) claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. Henry VI came to the throne only seven years after his father had trounced the French at Agincourt; but his cousin, Charles VII, who became king of France in the same year, spent his long reign rebutting the English king's claim to his throne by territorial reconquest and consolidation. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. As Henry VI's reign progressed, and the English grip on northern France loosened, the French Rolls also increasingly include entries concerning the ransoming of English prisoners.

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The English in France
 (1455)
Suffolk Charters (1460-1469)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Suffolk Charters
 (1460-1469)
Freemen of Dublin (1477)
The franchise rolls of the city of Dublin record the admissions of new freemen, by special grace, having served apprenticeship, or as child or son-in-law of a freeman, each fourth Friday after Easter, Midsummer, Michaelmas and Christmas each year.

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Freemen of Dublin
 (1477)
Dublin diocese testators and legatees (1457-1483)
This register of testaments or wills and inventories from the diocese of Dublin in the time of archbishops Tregury and Walton (now in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin) was printed with a translation by the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland in 1896-7. The inventory usually comes first, and often includes names of debtors and creditors to the testator. The diocese of Dublin did not extend far into the Pale; but the province of Dublin, over which the archbishops had prerogative probate jurisdiction, included the southern half of Ireland, but virtually all these wills are from the city of Dublin or close at hand.

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Dublin diocese testators and legatees
 (1457-1483)
Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims (1464-1524)
Criminals could evade pursuit by claiming sanctuary in Durham Cathedral. Persons who took refuge fled to the north door of the cathedral, and knocked for admission. There were two chambers over the door in which men slept, for the purpose of admitting fugitives at any hour of the night. As soon as anyone was so admitted, the Galilee bell was immediately tolled, to give notice that someone had taken sanctuary. The offender was required to declare before witnesses the nature of his offence, and to toll a bell in token of his demanding the privilege of sanctuary. He was then provided with a gown of black cloth with a yellow cross, called St Cuthbert's Cross, upon the left shoulder. A grate was provided near the south door to sleep upon, and for 37 days sufficient provisions and bedding were provided. But within 40 days he had to appear before the coroner, clothed in sackcloth, and be branded on his right hand with the sign of the letter A. This signified that he was swearing to abjure the realm: he was then free to leave the country unhindered. The petitions for immunity were entered in the diocesan registers, usually with the marginal note 'Peticio Immunitatis': those from 18 June 1464 to 10 September 1524 (the privilege was finally abolished in 1624) were edited and printed by the Surtees Society in 1837 under the title Sanctuarium Dunelmense. Some of the criminals came from a considerable distance: the great majority were murderers or homicides. Each entry usually gives full name, original address, (often) trade, a brief description of the crime, often with date, and usually the name of the victim, as well as the witnesses to the petition. This index covers all the surnames given.

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Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims
 (1464-1524)
Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

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Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
Retired monks, nuns and chantry priests in the east Midlands (1547-1551)
Lists of pensions being paid to monks, nuns and chantry priests in the diocese of Lincoln after the dissolution of the monasteries and chantries. The diocese covered Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, part of Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Leicestershire and Lincolnshire. Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Rutland, which had been shorn from the diocese, are not covered by these returns.

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Retired monks, nuns and chantry priests in the east Midlands
 (1547-1551)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1556-1558)
The Privy Council of king Philip and queen Mary was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1556-1558)
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