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Colly Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'colly'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 72 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of London (1275-1312)
Letter Book B of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1275-1312)
Inhabitants of Warwickshire (1332)
This lay subsidy roll for Warwickshire records the tax of a tenth and a fifteenth on the laity of the county at Michaelmas 1332. The record is arranged by boroughs, ancient demesnes, and hundreds, and within hundreds by township. The roll was translated and edited by William Fowler Carter and published by the Dugdale Society in 1926, with an appendix printing the lay subsidy rolls for Stratford-upon-Avon of 1309, 1313 and 1332, and a brief extract from an assize roll of 1323 inquiring about irregularities in the levying of the tax.

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Inhabitants of Warwickshire
 (1332)
Hampshire and Surrey clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1379)
Ordinations as acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop William de Wykeham of Winchester. Winchester diocese covered Hampshire and Surrey; the ordinations also attracted many persons from distant dioceses bearing letters dimissory from their ordinaries, and these are duly noted in the text. Many of these clerks would not go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars are indicated ('f.' = brother). The acolyte lists usually give parish of origin or title. The sample scan is from 1404.

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Hampshire and Surrey clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1379)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Staincross wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Penistone and Barnsley.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Staincross wapentake
 (1379)
Indults for Portable Altars: Diocese of Lincoln (1404-1415)
Individuals (laymen, monks or priests) could obtain indults or indulgences from the Pope to possess portable altars, enabling them to do their devotions in unconsecrated places. The fee was 10 groats for one person, 12 for two (frequently a husband and wife). Lists of these indults, headed De Altaris Portatilibus, were entered in the Lateran Regesta in the Vatican archives; from the reigns of popes Innocent VII to John XXIII (1404 to 1415) there are such lists in volumes CXIX, CXXXI, CLIX to CLXI, CLXV, CLXVII and CLXXXIV, from the first year of Innocent VII, the second year of Gregory XII, and the second to fifth years of John XXIII. Those relating to the British Isles were copied and translated by J. A. Twemlow, and printed under the direction of the Master of the Rolls in 1904. The diocese of Lincoln included Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Rutland, Northamptonshire, Oxfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire and part of Hertfordshire.

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Indults for Portable Altars: Diocese of Lincoln
 (1404-1415)
Plenary Remission of Sins: Diocese of Lincoln (1404-1415)
Individuals (laymen, monks or priests) could obtain indults or indulgences from the Pope that a confessor of their choice might give them, being penitent, plenary remission of sins, once only, in articulo mortis. Lists of these indults, headed De Plenaria Remissione, were entered in the Lateran Regesta in the Vatican archives; from the reigns of popes Innocent VII to John XXIII (1404 to 1415) there are such lists in volumes CXIX, CXXXI, CLIX to CLXI, CLXV, CLXVII and CLXXXIV, from the first year of Innocent VII, the second year of Gregory XII, and the second to fifth years of John XXIII. Those relating to the British Isles were copied and translated by J. A. Twemlow, and printed under the direction of the Master of the Rolls in 1904. The diocese of Lincoln comprised Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Rutland, Northamptonshire, Huntingdonshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, and part of Hertfordshire.

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Plenary Remission of Sins: Diocese of Lincoln
 (1404-1415)
Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire (1440-1441)
The Duchess of Norfolk allowed T. Walter Hall to examine the early archives of her Sheffield estates, and in 1926 he published a volume including abstracts (in translation) of the Sheffield manor court roll from October 1440 to September 1441. In this roll was also the Sheriff's tourn 18 April 1441 of the superior jurisdiction of Hallamshire, covering the sokes of Sheffield, Hannesworth, Bradfield, Southawe and Ecclesfield; and this is also printed. Hall found fragments of a Bradfield court roll of 1385; and devoted the latter half of his book to extracts from the Register of Copyholders' Surrenders, showing surrenders and admittances of copyhold tenants of the manor of Sheffield from 1403 to 1634; plus some miscellaneous deeds and documents relating to the manor and to Hallamshire. The index covers all these.

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Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire
 (1440-1441)
Agbrigg Wapentake Lay Subsidy: Anticipation (1545)
The lay subsidy of Agbrigg wapentake in the West Riding of Yorkshire (207/186) is in two parts: the anticipation and the final return. The subsidy, assessed at 1d in the pound on goods up to 5, 2d in the pound on goods worth 5 and above, and 2d in the pound on land, had been granted by parliament to king Henry VIII for three years. The anticipation, certified by the commissioners 30 April 1545, listed by township the holders of 6 or more in land or 10 or more in goods 'which said persons by virtue of our souerayng lords most jentill request and lovyng desire ar content frankly, quietly and indeladby to pay ther last payment' in advance, by way of anticipation of the third year's payment. The final return, certified 26 October 1545, lists the less wealthy part of the population, again by township, with their full names, assessment of their property, and (right-hand column) the amount due to be collected from them. The titles of some townships are obliterated: this is the index to those uncertain returns.

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Agbrigg Wapentake Lay Subsidy: Anticipation
 (1545)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Militia in North Petherton hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Bawdrip, (the borough of) Bridgwater, Chedzoy, Chilton Trinity, Durston, North Petherton, Pawlett, St Michaelchurch, Thurloxton and Wembdon. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in North Petherton hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
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