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Coan Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'coan'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 16 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Allegations for marriages in southern England (1679-1687)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1679-1687)
Official Papers (1691-1692)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1691-1692)
British officer prisoners (1780-1781)
Sir Henry Clinton at New York 24 January 1781 transmitted to lord George Germain (one of king George III's Principal Secretaries of State) this list of British officers, prisoners with the Americans, exchanged since 25 October 1780. The names are arranged by rank, and then by regiment.

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British officer prisoners
 (1780-1781)
Inhabitants of Halesworth in Suffolk (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Hull). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Halesworth in Suffolk
 (1790-1797)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Insolvents in Ireland (1846)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of insolvencies and stages in the process whereby the insolvents petitioned for release from debtors' prison. The insolvent is generally referred to by name (surname first), address and trade. This is the index to the names of Irish insolvents, from the issues from January to December 1846.

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Insolvents in Ireland
 (1846)
Civil Service Appointments (1855-1857)
The Civil Service Commission published this annual list of all persons who had obtained certificates of qualification for appointment in the various public departments. The list gives full name (surname first); department (such as Post Office, or Inland Revenue); situation (such as Letter-carrier, or Clerk); and date of certificate. Candidates whose names are preceded by a dagger obtained appointments as the result of competition. Those whose names are preceded by an asterisk obtained honorary additions to their certificates either for proficiency in extra subjects chosen by themselves, or for marked proficiency in the prescribed subjects. This list covers the period from 21 May 1855 (the date of the original Order in Council) to 31 December 1857.

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Civil Service Appointments
 (1855-1857)
National ArchivesRoyal Artillery fighting in China (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. Several batteries of the Royal Artillery took part in these actions.

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Royal Artillery fighting in China
 (1856-1860)
Dead Wesleyans (1867)
The Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine was issued monthly, and much of its contents related to obituaries of the faithful: memoirs and portraits of featured preachers; biographical sketches; recent deaths; and notices from the annual conference of ministers dying during the past year. Necessarily, the obituaries concentrate on the spiritual life of the deceased - early influences, conversion, obiter dicta, fortitude in the face of calamity, hopeful utterances in articulo mortis.

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Dead Wesleyans
 (1867)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the 79th (Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders) Regiment of Foot (1875-1881)
Each year the best soldiers of the regiment were chosen for long service and good conduct medals. This register gives rank, name, regimental number, and date of recommendation. (The sample scan is from the 34th foot). The register is essentially a register of recommendations, but from 1877-8 onwards there are also details of the issue of the medals. The regiment was moved from England to Scotland in 1875, and in 1879 from there to Gibraltar.

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Outstanding soldiers of the 79th (Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
 (1875-1881)
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