Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Cleft Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'cleft'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

Buy all
Get all 8 records to view, to save and print for £38.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Middlesex Recusants (1625-1666)
Incidents from the Middlesex Sessions Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the volumes of Gaol Delivery Register, Books and Rolls, Sessions of Peace Register, and Process Books of Indictments for the county of Middlesex from the death of king James I to the Great Fire of London. The references at the end of each item indicate the volume in question, the abbreviations being G. D. for Gaol Delivery, S. P. for Sessions of Peace, and S. O. T. for Session of Oyer and Terminer; occasionally preceded by S. for Special or G. for general, or followed by R. for Roll or Reg. for Register. It should be noted that, in the case of 'true bills' or indictments, the abstract starts with the date on which the offence took place, the date of the conviction &c. being at the end of the entry. There are many records of recusants, that is Protestants and Roman Catholics who failed to attend Church of England services. These abstracts, prepared by John Cordy Jeaffreson for the Middlesex County Record Society, are far from being a complete calendar of these extensive records; his purpose was, in part, to notice 'every parchment that should exhibit a famous person's name or any other feature of personal interest'. Being unable to print in full the longer lists of the conventiclers and recusants recorded, he ignores 'those persons who appear from their descriptions to have been of humble degree'.

CLEFT. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Middlesex Recusants
 (1625-1666)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

CLEFT. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Inhabitants of Beaminster in Dorset (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Bath). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

CLEFT. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Beaminster in Dorset
 (1790-1797)
Staffordshire Villages Directory: Smethwick (1818)
The Staffordshire General and Commercial Directory was published by W. Parson and T. Bradshaw in 1818 in thirty sections for the major towns, followed by lists for the separate villages. In each village the traders are listed alphabetically under surname, with occupation.

CLEFT. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Staffordshire Villages Directory: Smethwick
 (1818)
Deaths, Marriages, Bankrupts, Dividends and Patents (1820-1821)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, bankrupts and dividends, and patents, as reported in the Monthly Magazine or British Register. Includes some marriages and deaths from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

CLEFT. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Deaths, Marriages, Bankrupts, Dividends and Patents
 (1820-1821)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: New Winchester (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

CLEFT. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: New Winchester
 (1861)
Residents of East Africa (1922)
The East African Standard compiled this directory of residents of Kenya Colony (K.C.) and Protectorate, Uganda Protectorate (U.P. or Ug.), Tanganyika Territory (T.T.) and Zanzibar Sultanate (Z. or Zbr.)

CLEFT. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Residents of East Africa
 (1922)
Residents of Southampton (1956)
Kelly's Directory of Southampton and Neighbourhood for 1956 lists private residents by surname, christian name(s), house, street and area, for the whole of the county borough of Southampton in Hampshire, including Portswood, Freemantle, Shirley, Bassett, Bitterne, Bitterne Park, Itchen, Sholing, North Stoneham, South Stoneham, Swaythling, Weston with Newtown, Woolston, Redbridge and West End.

CLEFT. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Residents of Southampton
 (1956)
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.