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Chancellor Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'chancellor'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 175 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Freemen and citizens of London (1291-1309)
Letter Book C of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c. The text was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe and printed by order of the Corporation of the City of London in 1901.

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Freemen and citizens of London
 (1291-1309)
Tenants of the Bishopric of Durham (1345)
Bishop Hatfield's Survey, a record of the possessions of the see of Durham, made by order of Thomas de Hatfield, bishop of Durham 1345 to 1381, was edited by the Rev. William Greenwell for the Surtees Society and printed in 1856. As appendixes, he also transcribed a bailiff's roll of the manor of Auckland from the 5th year of bishop Richard de Bury, Hatfield's immediate predecessor; several bailiffs' rolls of the 5th year of Hatfield's pontificate; and a general receiver's roll of bishop John de Fordham, Hatfield's immediate successor.

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Tenants of the Bishopric of Durham
 (1345)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1350-1354)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 24th to the 27th years of the reign of king Edward III (25 January 1350 to 24 January 1354) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. F. Isaacson, and published in 1907. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1350-1354)
Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

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Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
Militia in Chew hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Chew Magna, Chew Stoke, Clutton, Dundry, Norton Malreward, Stowey and Timsbury, north of Radstock. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Chew hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Official Papers (1547-1580)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1547-1580)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1585-1592)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 1 August 1585 to 31 July 1592, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1881. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 774) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, with intermixed Acta Proper (political edicts), Decreta (judicial decisions), Acta Cautionis (acts of caution) and Bands (registration of bonds). After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years: additional acts of caution (775-778); ordinances and acts anent the Borders and the North (779-814); and miscellaneous privy council papers (815-834). The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1585-1592)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1610-1613)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1610 to February 1613, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1889. The publication starts with the Acta and Decreta, a chronological consolidation of material from Acta Secreti Concilii proper, the Decreta, the Book of Commissions, the Book of Sederunts, the Minute Book of Processes, and The Book of the Isles. There is then a section of Royal and Other Letters (pp. 565-644); then acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp. 647-690); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (693-746). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1610-1613)
Official Papers (1641-1643)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. These records are from June 1641 to December 1643: there is also a set of abstracts of navy correspondence.

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Official Papers
 (1641-1643)
Home family archives (1424-1671)
William Fraser of the Historical Manuscripts Commission examined the archives of the Earl of Home at Hirsel (near Coldstream in Berwickshire), and prepared this calendar, published in 1891.The most detailed account is of 'Documents, more or less of a Personal Nature relating to the Principal Members of the Family of Home' (pp. 87-107), and 'Old Charters and other Documents still in the Charter Chest at Hirsel, relating to Lands formerly possessed by the family' (107-170), with deeds relating to Auldcambus, Aldcathy, Arbirlot, Bedshiel, Bogend, Braidley, Brigham, Brighamshiels, Chirnside, Coldingham, Cowdenknowes, Crailing, Dalswinton, Derington, Dunglas, Eccles priory, Eltrive, Eskdale, Ewesdale, Fogo, Gordon, Greenlaw, Greenwood, Haddington, Harden, Hassington, Hassendean and Horsliehill, Hoscoat, Howlaws, Howpasley, Huntlywood, Jedburgh, Lambden, Lauder, Letham, Leyacres, Luchheild (in Fife), Mawdristoun (Manderston), Maw (in Fife), Mawes (in Perthshire), Mellerstain, East Nisbet, Samuelston, Smailholm, Sprouston, St Bothans (St Bathan), Swynset, Thornton, Tinneis (in Yarrow), and Upsetlington. Fraser was then allowed to inspect the family charters held by their law agent in Edinburgh in nine charter chests, and gives abstracts of the early items that he considered important. This volume also contains his calendar of some of the muniments of the Duke of Athole at Blair Castle, Blair Athole, concentrating on family correspondence from 1473 to 1721: this is also included in this index.

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Home family archives
 (1424-1671)
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