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Chalner Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'chalner'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire (1440-1441)
The Duchess of Norfolk allowed T. Walter Hall to examine the early archives of her Sheffield estates, and in 1926 he published a volume including abstracts (in translation) of the Sheffield manor court roll from October 1440 to September 1441. In this roll was also the Sheriff's tourn 18 April 1441 of the superior jurisdiction of Hallamshire, covering the sokes of Sheffield, Hannesworth, Bradfield, Southawe and Ecclesfield; and this is also printed. Hall found fragments of a Bradfield court roll of 1385; and devoted the latter half of his book to extracts from the Register of Copyholders' Surrenders, showing surrenders and admittances of copyhold tenants of the manor of Sheffield from 1403 to 1634; plus some miscellaneous deeds and documents relating to the manor and to Hallamshire. The index covers all these.

CHALNER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire
 (1440-1441)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular (1507)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 18 December 1507, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

CHALNER. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular
 (1507)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular (1508)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 17 June 1508, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

CHALNER. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular
 (1508)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Priests Secular (1508)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 23 September 1508, by Thomas, bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

CHALNER. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Priests Secular
 (1508)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Acolytes Regular (1509)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 22 September 1509, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

CHALNER. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Acolytes Regular
 (1509)
Patent Roll 1 Henry VIII (1509-1510)
Royal grants of all kinds were enrolled on the Patent Rolls of England. Many of these grants originated as signed bills (S. B.) or privy seals (P. S.). J. S. Brewer calendared the rolls for the first year of the reign of king Henry VIII (22 April 1509-21 April 1510) for the Master of the Rolls, including all the surviving signed bills and privy seals (some of which had never led to enrolment), in this volume published in 1862. We have reindexed this: most of the names that occur are of those granted royal offices, or wardships or ecclesiastical preferments that were in the hands of the Crown, and often the names of those whom they superseded.

CHALNER. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Patent Roll 1 Henry VIII 
 (1509-1510)
Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire (1406-1535)
The Hospital of the Holy Cross was founded in 1269; in time this fraternity became a social and religious gild. 'The Register of the Gild of the Holy Cross, the Blessed Mary and St John the Baptist of Stratford-upon-Avon' was edited by J. Harvey Bloom, rector of Whitchurch, and printed in 1907. The register is a record of admissions to the gild, an account of the fines paid by new members, and the names of those in arrear. Each year's record usually starts on the Monday after Ascension Day (the sixth Thursday after Easter), when the new aldermen, master and proctors of the gild were elected, all duly named. Then follow the admissions to the gild, including payments for prayers and candles (lights) for the faithful dead; and the names of the sureties for these payments. Interspersed with this are occasional proclamations and memoranda concerning the fraternity. A peculiarity of this publication is that the years given at the head of each page (e. g. 1502-3) are those of the regnal year (in that case 18 Henry VII) in which the Monday after Ascension Day fell. The regnal years of Henry IV, Henry VI, Richard III and Henry VII all started after that day in the calendars of 1399, 1422, 1483 and 1485; so the gild registers during those years actually cover the following year to that shown in this printed text (in that case, 1503-4).

CHALNER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire
 (1406-1535)
Tradesmen of Chester (1392-1805)
Lists of admissions of freemen of the city of Chester from the earliest surviving records to 1805 were compiled by J. H. E. Bennett and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society from 1906. These lists were extracted from the mayoral yearbooks (dating back to 1392) and twelve freemen's rolls covering 1538 to 1612 and 1636 to 1805; and a list of admissions for 1505-1506 in Harleian MS 2105 (British Library). The record does not become more or less continuous until about 1490: in all, 12,426 freedoms are recorded. Freedom of the city, necessary to practise a trade in the city, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); or by order of assembly. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B, freedom taken up by right of birth; I, freedom taken up by right of indenture; M. B., Mayor's Book; *, freedom granted by order of assembly.

CHALNER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Tradesmen of Chester
 (1392-1805)
Manchester Directory (1825)
W. Parson compiled this Manchester trades directory included in the second volume of the History, Directory, and Gazetteer of the County Palatine of Lancaster, by Edward Baines, published in 1825. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name, with address, including house numbers where appropriate.

CHALNER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Manchester Directory
 (1825)
Unclaimed Dividends (1835)
Names of creditors yet to claim dividends from bankrupts' estates

CHALNER. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Unclaimed Dividends
 (1835)
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