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Challons Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'challons'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1577-1700)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1588 to 1754 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1577-1700)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Nottinghamshire (1791)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/66

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Apprentices registered in Nottinghamshire
 (1791)
National ArchivesMen of the 24th Regiment of Foot (2nd Warwickshire) fighting in South Africa (1877-1879)
What is commonly called the Zulu War Medal was awarded to those British soldiers who fought in a series of conflicts in southern Africa from 1877 (the Kaffir War) through to 1879 (the Zulu War). In 1880 the various units submitted returns of the officers, non-commissioned officers and men 'entitled to the Medal for Military Operations in South Africa during 1877-8-9' and these 'medal rolls' are now in the National Archives. The returns are made with the information arranged in twelve columns: 1. Rank and name 2. Regimental number and rank at the time the medal was earned 3. Whether in possession of medal for previous wars 4. Whether engaged against the Gaikas, Galekas and other Kaffir tribes 1877-8 5. Whether engaged against Pokwane 1878 6. Whether engaged against the Griquas 1878 7. Whether engaged against the Zulus 1879 8. Whether engaged against Sekukuni as set forth in Par. 2. G. O. 9. Whether engaged against Moirosi's stronghold 10. Entitled to medal without clasp under Par. 4. 11. Serving with regiment, depot, dead, discharged, deserted, &c. 12. Notes and cross-references to the Adjutant-General's medal lists. WO 100/46.

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Men of the 24th Regiment of Foot (2nd Warwickshire) fighting in South Africa
 (1877-1879)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the British Army Service Corps (1875-1881)
Each year the best soldiers were chosen for long service and good conduct medals. This register gives rank, name, regimental number, and date of recommendation. (The sample scan is from the 34th foot). The register is essentially a register of recommendations, but from 1877-8 onwards there are also details of the issue of the medals.

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Outstanding soldiers of the British Army Service Corps
 (1875-1881)
National ArchivesLondon Policemen (1878-1891)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/335) lists policemen joining the force 1 July 1878 to 31 December 1891 (warrant numbers 62845 to 77318). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname (I and J, and U and V being treated as single initials). It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal.

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London Policemen
 (1878-1891)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the Northumberland Fusiliers (1881-1901)
Each year the best soldiers of the regiment were chosen for long service and good conduct medals. This register gives rank, name, regimental number, and date of recommendation. (The sample scan is from the East Surrey regiment). The register is essentially a register of recommendations, annotated with details of the issue of the medals. Where no gratuity accompanied the medal, the entry is marked 'W. G.' (without gratuity); where, for one reason or another, the medal was not issued, the entry is marked 'N. S.' (not sanctioned) and struck through. The regiment was based on the 5th Regimental District - Newcastle-on-Tyne. The 1st battalion returned from Bengal in 1880, and in 1885 was stationed at Dublin. In 1895 it was at Aldershot. The 2nd battalion embarked for Bengal in 1880, and by 1885 was at Chuckrata, and was moved on to Singapore by 1895. The regiment added "Khartoum", "South Africa, 1899-1902" and "Modder River" to its honours during this period.

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Outstanding soldiers of the Northumberland Fusiliers
 (1881-1901)
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