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Caset Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'caset'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
British in the East (1630-1634)
The East India State Papers centre on the records of the East India Company, trading to India, the East Indies, Persia and China. They include the Court Minutes of the East India Company.

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British in the East
 (1630-1634)
Masters of Merchantmen (1785)
The Daily Universal Register of April 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Plymouth, Whitby, Cowes, Falmouth, Bristol and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Creek(e), in the Downs, off the Lizard, off Scilly, off the Start, in Studland Bay, off Whitby, off the Wight, at Aberdeen, Alicante, Ancona, Antigua, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Barcelona, Bayonne, Belfast, Bombay, Bonny, Bordeaux, Brighthelmstone (Brighton), Bristol, Cadiz, Carlingford, Cartagena, Charlestown, Cork, Cowes, Cuxhaven, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Dunkirk, Falmouth, Galway, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guernsey, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Hamburg, Havre de Grace, Hull, Jersey, Kinsale, Lancaster, Leghorn, Limerick, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, Lochryan, Malaga, Marseilles, Montserrat, Nantes, New Providence (Bahamas), New York, Newry, Oporto, Ostend, Penzance, Plymouth, Poole, Portsmouth, Rotterdam, St Eustatia, St John's, St Kitts, St Vincents, Scarborough, Scilly, Seville, Southampton, Stangate Creek, Tenerife, Texel, Tobago, Venice, Waterford, Weymouth, Whitehaven, and in 'Africa', Georgia, Jamaica, Maryland, North Carolina, Philadelphia, South Carolina and Virginia; and Coast Lists made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1785)
Officials and officers of the Admiralty, dockyards, and maritime institutions (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists officials and clerks of the Admiralty at Charing Cross, including those of the Admiralty Court; then there are the various civil departments of the Admiralty at Somerset Place: the Surveyor's Department, the Accountant-General's Department, Storekeeper-General's Department, Department of the Comptroller for Victualling and Transport Services; Department of the Physician-General; the Dockyards at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, Sheerness, Deal, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Pembroke, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Malta, Cape of Good Hope, Trincomalee and Bermuda; the Victualling Officers at the outports of Deptford, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Sheerness and Cork; the Royal Naval Hospitals at Haslar, Plymouth, Malta, Jamaica and Bermuda; the Royal Marines' Navy and Marine Agents in London; the Royal Hospital at Greenwich; Royal Hospital School; Corporation of the Trinity House; Corporation for Sick and Maimed Seamen in the Merchants Service; Royal Naval Benevolent Society; Naval Medical Supplemental Fund; Marine Society; London Maritime Institution; Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck; and the Royal Naval School for Educating the Sons of the Less Affluent Naval and Marine Officers at the Least Possible Expense.

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Officials and officers of the Admiralty, dockyards, and maritime institutions
 (1841)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the great bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1830-1842)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Royal Albert in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Royal Albert, a 120-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site. This index also covers the Royal Albert's two tenders, the Clinker and the Grinder.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Royal Albert in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
National ArchivesMen of the 2nd Waikato Regiment who served in the New Zealand War (1861-1870)
New Zealand War Medal roll for members of the 2nd Waikato Regiment who volunteered for service in the Imperial Commissariat Transport Corps in the New Zealand campaign 1861 to 1866: the rolls were compiled following a general order in 1869 and the medals were distributed in 1870.

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Men of the 2nd Waikato Regiment who served in the New Zealand War
 (1861-1870)
Inhabitants of New Windsor in Berkshire (1877)
Gentry, farmers and traders listed in J. G. Harrod's Royal County Directory of Berkshire. (The sample scan is from the section for Wallingford)

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Inhabitants of New Windsor in Berkshire
 (1877)
Irish Debtors and Bankrupts (1880)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), and bankruptcies in Ireland, January to March 1880

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Irish Debtors and Bankrupts
 (1880)
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