Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Carriage Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'carriage'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

Buy all
Get all 8 records to view, to save and print for £54.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

City of Westminster Voters (1780)
The poll for the election of two citizens to serve in Parliament for the City and Liberty of Westminster was begun 7 September and ended 23 September 1780, the candidates being the Hon. Charles James Fox (F), Sir George Brydges Rodney, bart. (R), and the Right Hon. Thomas Pelham Clinton the Earl of Lincoln (L). In this poll book the names of all voters are given, by parish and within each parish by street, arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name, with the individual votes cast shown in the right hand columns. Pages 1 to 48 cover the parish of St George, Hanover Square; 49 to 100, St Martin; 101 to 134, St Clement and St Mary le Strand; 135 to 155, St Ann, Soho; 157 to 166, St Paul, Covent Garden; 167 to 170, St Martin le Grand; 171 to 224, St James; 225 to 274, St Margaret and St John.

CARRIAGE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
City of Westminster Voters
 (1780)
Inhabitants of Newton Bushel in Devon (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Bridgnorth). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797. This particular list was included in the appendix of late returns.

CARRIAGE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Newton Bushel in Devon
 (1790-1797)
Inhabitants of Weymouth in Dorset (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Nottingham). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

CARRIAGE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Weymouth in Dorset
 (1790-1797)
Norwich Residents, Officers and Officials (1842)
The Norwich Guide and Directory 'being an Historical and Topographical Description of the City and its Hamlets; with an Account of the Public Charities, and Correct Lists of the Various Professions, Trades, Public Institutions, Churches, Chapels, Municipal and other Offices; also the Names and Residences of the Nobility, Clergy, and Gentry; together with the Hours of the Arrival and Departure of the Mail and Post Coaches, Vans, Carriers, Steam and Sailing Vessels, and all Conveyances to London and the various Parts of the County of Norfolk', by G. K. Blyth, was published in 1842, and includes detailed lists of local institutions, trades and professions.

CARRIAGE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Norwich Residents, Officers and Officials
 (1842)
National ArchivesSailors of H. M. S. Albion who fought at Inkerman (1854)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). Her Majesty's Ship Albion, a 90-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff. This is the roll for the sailors of the ship actually present at the battle of Inkerman, on 5 November 1854, where the Russian troops made an ultimately unsuccessful attack on the allied army.

CARRIAGE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Sailors of H. M. S. Albion who fought at Inkerman
 (1854)
Missionary donations from Hampshire (1855)
The Congregational and a number of other independent churches together formed the Evangelical Alliance, committed to promoting and supporting missions to the heathen. The areas chosen for their projects were Guiana, South Africa, India, the South Seas and China. The work of the missionaries was not only in preaching the Gospel, but also in translating the Bible into local languages, and establishing churches, schools and orphanages. Orphans and native teachers were often given the names of principal contributors or congregations back in Britain. In Britain the large amounts of money needed for this work were raised among the Congregational and independent congregations, arranged by auxiliaries for each county (although some contributions for each county might in fact come in from congregations and individuals in neighbouring areas); money was gathered by ministers, at special services, by supporters, and in missionary boxes. The accounts of all these contributions were published as part of a monthly magazine called the Evangelical Magazine. Each issue of the magazine carried obituaries of prominent members of the congregations; general articles on religion; reviews of newly-published religious books; home news, mainly about meetings of importance or interest by the alliance or in individual churches; and then a separate section called the Missionary Chronicle. The Missionary Chronicle was devoted to letters and reports from the missionaries; and concludes with a set of accounts of donations towards the missionary work. This is the index to the donations reported in the magazine, January to December 1855, from Hampshire.

CARRIAGE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Missionary donations from Hampshire
 (1855)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Albion in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Albion, a 90-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

CARRIAGE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Albion in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors of H. M. S. Albion who fought at Sebastopol (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). Her Majesty's Ship Albion, a 90-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff. Here we have the list of the men from the ship who served as part of the naval brigade that actually fought at Sebastopol (Sevastopol, Sevastapol).

CARRIAGE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Sailors of H. M. S. Albion who fought at Sebastopol
 (1854-1856)
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.