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Candey Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'candey'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Wandsworth Burials (1771)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.

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Wandsworth Burials
 (1771)
National ArchivesMerchant Seamen (1835-1844)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. In this volume the register is restarted from 1840 onwards, with the mariner's previous number (if any) being entered in the column after his birthplace. In the event of it becoming known that a man had died during the course of a voyage, that information is written across the remaining empty columns. This volume (BT 112/11) covers mariners whose surnames start with Ca (and McCa).

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Merchant Seamen
 (1835-1844)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1887)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, April to June 1887

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1887)
National ArchivesQueen's South Africa Medal: Royal Field Artillery: 69th Battery (1901-1905)
The nominal roll for the Queen Victoria's South Africa Medal - awarded (after her death, in the event) to all who had served honourably in the various campaigns in the Boer War - was compiled from these returns from the individual units. Two sets of form were completed. The main one, as in the sample scan, dates from 1901 and gives regimental number, rank, and full name (surname first), followed by a series of columns relating to different actions - Belmont, Modder River, Paardeberg, Dreifontein, Wepener, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast, Wittebergen, Defence of Kimberley, Relief of Kimberley, Defence of Mafeking, Relief of Mafeking, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, Rhodesia, Talana, Elandslaagte, Tugela Heights, Defence of Ladysmith, Relief of Ladysmith, Laing's Nek, and Natal; each entitled the man to a separate clasp to the medal, and a tick or a Yes in the appropriate column indicates the man's actual physical presence in that battle. A final column for remarks is important in those cases where the man was no longer in the unit, by removal, death or desertion. The second form that sometimes occurs was returned in 1905, and covers men entitled to the Second South African War Medal and Clasps. It lists men by number, rank and name, checks whether they had claimed the Queen's South Africa Medal, and then enquires as to their suitability as to three Colony Clasps, which could be awarded for service in the Cape, Orange Free, or Transvaal; whether entitled to Date Clasps (South Africa 1901 and South Africa 1902); whether also entitled to the King's South Africa Medal; any other corps in which served in South Africa; and remarks (such as becoming non-effective, forfeiture, &c.) WO 100/142

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Queen's South Africa Medal: Royal Field Artillery: 69th Battery
 (1901-1905)
Naval Officers (1920)
The alphabetical list of officers on the Active List of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines (RM) and of the Retired and Emergency Officers serving gives: number of ship or where otherwise serving; name (surname, first christian name and initials); rank; and the dates of their seniority. This is the list from the March 1920 edition of the Navy List, corrected to 18 February 1920.

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Naval Officers
 (1920)
Traders and Professionals in Bournemouth (1934)
Kelly's Directory of Bournemouth and Poole for 1934 includes this commercial directory for Bournemouth, Branksome Park, Boscombe (B), Boscombe East (B. East), Ensbury (E), Ensbury Park (W. P), Pokesdown (P) and Winton (Win).

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Traders and Professionals in Bournemouth
 (1934)
Imperial Service Medal (1939)
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

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Imperial Service Medal
 (1939)
Inhabitants of Leamington Spa (1953)
Kelly's Directory of Warwick, Leamington Spa, Stratford-upon-Avon, Kenilworth &c for 1953 ("Buff Book") includes this list of private residents and commercial directory for Royal Leamington Spa, including Lillington, Milverton, New Milverton and Blackdown (Blakedown).

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Inhabitants of Leamington Spa
 (1953)
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