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Campe Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'campe'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 54 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Pipe Roll (1201-1202)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. Two sets of pipe rolls were prepared, not exact duplicates, the main series being the Treasurer's or Exchequer rolls, the copies (of which fewer have survived) being the Chancellor's rolls. The Chancellor's roll (or Antigraphum) for the 3rd year of king John became separated from that series at some date, and found its way to the miscellaneous records in the Chapter House at Westminster. As it happens, the Chancellor's roll for that year is in a better state of preservation than the Treasurer's roll, so it was chosen for publication by the Commissioners on the Public Records of the Kingdom, by whom it was printed in extenso in 1833.

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Pipe Roll
 (1201-1202)
Curia Regis Rolls (1219-1220)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period. Rolls 71 and 71B for Michaelmas term of the 3rd and 4th years, and 72 and 73 for Hilary term and Easter term of the 4th year of the reign of king Henry III (Michaelmas 1219 to Easter 1220) were edited by C. T. Flower of the Public Record Office and published in 1938. Each entry is copied in full, the Latin extended from the abbreviated original, the personal and place names given as in the original; where these vary between duplicate rolls, variant spellings are given in the footnotes. The county of each case was marked in the margin in the originals, and this is shown in italics at the start of each entry in the printed edition.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1219-1220)
Inhabitants of Cliffe in the East Riding of Yorkshire (1379)
The poll tax returns of the 2nd year of the reign of king Richard II for Howdenshire, the area around Howden, were transcribed from the original in the Public Record Office (Exchequer Lay Subsidies 202/69) and published in the Yorkshire Archaeological & Topographical Journal in 1886. In editing the text, the abbreviated Latin has been extended, and those occupations that appear have been put in italics. The normal tax for a husbandman or labourer and his wife was 4d, as was that for a single person; but tradesmen paid 6d or more.

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Inhabitants of Cliffe in the East Riding of Yorkshire
 (1379)
Norman Rolls (1200-1417)
The dukedom of Normandy is one of the appendages of the English crown, but actual possession of the dukedom was actively contested by the kings of France. During the periods of English power records were kept for Normandy similar to those of the royal administration in England, with enrolment of letters and grants of liberties and privileges and confirmations of previous enjoyed rights. The rolls for 1200 to 1205 and during the reassertion of English rule under Henry V in 1417, were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy for the Commissioners of the Public Records, and published in 1835. Most of the persons mentioned are French inhabitants of Normandy or Englishmen in France, but there is also a long section (from page 122 onwards) of valuation of lands of Normans in England, where English jurors, county by English county, attest to acreage, numbers of cattle &c.

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Norman Rolls
 (1200-1417)
Ablemen of Norwich (1457)
The Old Free Book of the city of Norwich includes this muster roll of about 1457. Able-bodied men are listed subleet by subleet, with a note of the armour furnished or sum of money raised towards buying armour. About 600 persons are assessed, 80 of whom assessed for money only appear to be additions to the original list. A total of 480 jacks were assigned: a 'jack' being a jacket similar to a gambeson or doublet.

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Ablemen of Norwich
 (1457)
Inhabitants of Leicester (1327-1509)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1901) of extracts from the borough archives of 1327 to 1509, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: a coroner's roll of 1327; the merchant gild rolls; tax returns; court rolls; rentals; mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for tallages of 1336 (pp. 34-40); 1347-8 (69-71); and 1354 (93-99); subsidy rolls of 1492 (331-334) and 1497 (351-353); and a benevolence roll of 1505 (370-374). There is a calendar of conveyances (388-446), and a list of mayors, bailiffs, and other officials (447-462); and, finally, entrants into the merchant gild from 1465 to 1510. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). Those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but thitherto the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there.

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Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1327-1509)
Recipients of grants of land by the Crown; and other grantors and grantees (1427-1516)
Grants of land by the Crown were enrolled on the Charter Rolls: but this series of records was also used by other magnates and religious houses as a way of having their own deeds inspected, confirmed and registered. It will be seen from this that some of the material described in these inspeximuses dates back to a considerably earlier period. In addition, there is an appendix of fragments of charter roll material from 1215 and 1286 to 1288. The royal grants enrolled relate not only to land, but also to various privileges that were part of the royal prerogative. Most of the material is from England, the remainder relating to Ireland, Wales and possessions in France, but virtually nothing from Scotland, which was an independent kingdom at this period.

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Recipients of grants of land by the Crown; and other grantors and grantees
 (1427-1516)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Taxpayers in Sussex (1524-1525)
By Act of Parliament of 1523 (14 & 15 Hen. III, c. 16) a general subsidy was raised, spread over four years, from laymen, clergy and peers. In each of the first two years 1s in the was raised from annual income from land; 1s in the on capital goods worth over 2 and under 20; and a flat payment of 4d on goods worth from 1 to 2, and also by persons aged 16 and upwards in receipt of 1 per annum in wages. In the third year a further shilling in the pound was payable on land worth 50 and upwards a year; and in the fourth year a shilling in the pound on goods worth 50 and upwards. To raise this revenue, returns were required from every hundred, parish or township. In Sussex, the returns for 1524 and 1525 cover the city of Chichester (divided into Estrata, Westrata, Southstrata, North[strata] and Palenta), the borough of Midhurst, and then the rest of the county divided into rapes, within those into hundreds, and within those into boroughs, tithings, liberties, townships or parishes. It is important to note that the cinque ports of Hastings, Rye and Winchelsea were exempt from the subsidy, except for alien inhabitants; and that the town of Westbourne was also exempted 'as the town was lately destroyed by fire'. Aliens are noted as such, sometimes with nationality; and Brighthelmstone (Brighton), which had been burnt by the French in 1514, is only represented fragmentarily. The Sussex Record Society published this transcript and edition by Julian Cornwall of the 1524 and 1525 returns: the 1524 return was used for the main transcript where possible, names peculiar to the 1524 lists being marked with an asterisk, and those with amendments in 1524 with a dagger. At the foot of each 1524 return the new names from 1525 are given. Only the amount of the assessment is printed (m. = marks). Letters prefixed to the sum give the basis of the assessment, no letter (or G) meaning that it was on goods - A, annual wages; D, annual wages of day-labourers; F, fees or salaries of office; L, lands; P, profits; W, wages; x, no basis stated.

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Taxpayers in Sussex
 (1524-1525)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1542-1547)
The Privy Council of Henry VIII was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1542-1547)
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