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Butterwick Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'butterwick'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 57 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Yorkshire Inquisitions (1241-1283)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Both sets of inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association, and printed in 1891. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1241-1283)
Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)
The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This first part contains the charters from folios 1 to 233, items I to DXCIII. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated.

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Guisborough Cartulary
 (1119-1300)
Charter Rolls (1050-1326)
This abstract of the surviving charter rolls for 1300 to 1326, in the reigns of kings Edward I and II, was prepared by C. G. Crump and A. E. Stamp and published in 1908. The charter rolls not only recorded royal grants of lands, liberties and offices, but also enabled landowners to have their existing charters, their deeds of title, registered by the process of inspeximus and confirmation. After the Statute of Mortmain of 1279, this was of particular importance to religious houses, now greatly restricted in their ability to receive new donations of land, and anxious to prove title to their ancient property. Consequently, many charters of great age were copied onto the charter rolls.

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Charter Rolls
 (1050-1326)
Inhabitants of Leicester (1103-1327)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1899) of extracts from the earliest borough archives, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: the borough charters; the merchant gild rolls (from 1196 onwards); tax returns; court rolls (from about 1260 onwards); mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). The sample scan shows part of a gild entrance roll; those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but at this period the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for a loan for redemption of pontage and gavelpence of 1252-3 (pp. 44-46); five tallages of 1269 to 1271 brought together in a single table (128-145); and tallages of 1286 (208-211), 1307 (255-257), 1311 (272-274) and 1318 (310-313). The portmanmoot (or portmote) was the borough court dealing with minor infractions and civil suits. Finally, there is a calendar of charters (from c.1232 onwards, 381-400), and a list of mayors, bailiffs (reeves), receivers and serjeants (401-407).

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Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1103-1327)
Inhabitants of Nottingham (1485-1547)
The muniments of the borough of Nottingham include extensive mediaeval archives. A selection from these from the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII was prepared and edited by W. H. Stevenson for the Corporation, and printed, with translations of the passages in Latin, in 1885. The principal sources used are the borough Court Books, largely dealing with civil cases, for which an almost complete series survives for this period; Sessions Rolls (92 survive for the two reigns), in which crimes and misdemeanours are recorded; a Mickletorn or Leet jury roll; detailed chamberlains' and bridge-wardens' accounts; and the Hall Books, or council minutes. There are lists of burgesses enrolled; bakers admitted to bake; and fines for licences to trade. A subsidy roll of 1523-4 lists householders by street, and there is an appendix of local deeds, including some material dating back to the 14th century.

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Inhabitants of Nottingham
 (1485-1547)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Jurymen in the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)
The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. This is the index to the jurors.

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Jurymen in the North Riding of Yorkshire
 (1605-1612)
Intended Bridegrooms in Yorkshire (1626)
William Paver, a 19th-century Yorkshire genealogist, made brief abstracts of early marriage licences (now lost) in York Registry. His manuscript, which became Additional Manuscripts 29667 in the British Museum, was transcribed by J. W. Clay, F. S. A., and printed in various issues of the Yorkshire Archaeological Journal: this is from the volume for 1903. Paver did not note the dates of the licences, merely listing them by year: his abstracts give the names and addresses of both parties, and the name of the parish church in which it was intended that the wedding would take place.

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Intended Bridegrooms in Yorkshire
 (1626)
Official Papers (1639)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1639)
York Will Calendar (1660-1665)
The diocese of York comprised most of Yorkshire, and Nottinghamshire: the York Exchequer court was the ordinary probate jurisdiction for the Yorkshire part of the diocese, but some wills from Nottinghamshire and other parts of the province of York were also proved there. Dr Francis Collins compiled this index to the wills in the York registry proved from 1660 to 1665. The date of the probate precedes the name of the testator: during the period covered by the volume the dates of probate are very rarely given in the registers - they were therefore supplied from the Act Books. However, the Act Book for Ainsty, City and Craven deaneries is missing for this period, and in those cases no date could be given. In a very few instances (marked with an asterisk) in these deaneries in which the date has been supplied it has been taken from the registers. Additional matter from the Act Books is given within square brackets. Testators' names are given in full, surname first; then parish or place of abode, and in some cases occupation; then date of the will itself; and volume and folio number in the probate register. Where a place of burial, or intended burial, was indicated, that is also added, with the word 'bur.', within round brackets. All wills between 1652 and 1660 were proved in London; in practice, many Yorkshire wills had remained unproved at the date that the York Exchequer probate court was restored, and so there is in this list a large number of wills dating back through the 1650s.

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York Will Calendar
 (1660-1665)
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