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Butterly Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'butterly'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 18 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
Voters in Bramber rape, Sussex (1774)
A poll of freeholders to elect two knights of the shire to represent the county of Sussex was taken at Chichester in 1774. This poll book lists each voter's full name; abode; where the freehold lay and of what it consisted (b., barn; f., farm; g., garden; h., house; l., land; m., mill; o., orchard; r., rectory; w. sh., workshop); and the name of the occupier (if any) (often surname only); with dashes in the right-hand columns indicating votes for the candidates, Lord George Henry Lennox, sir Thomas Spencer Wilson and sir James Peachey. The franchise was limited to freeholders of 40 shillings per annum and more. The sample scan shows part of Chichester rape. The rape of Bramber included Bramber, Horsham, Shoreham, Steyning and Worthing and the surrounding countryside.

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Voters in Bramber rape, Sussex
 (1774)
Inhabitants of Dartford in Kent (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Bath). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Dartford in Kent
 (1790-1797)
Irish Insolvents (1827)
Insolvency notices for Ireland: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links, especially for emigrants

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Irish Insolvents
 (1827)
National ArchivesMerchant Seamen (1835-1844)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. In this volume the register is restarted from 1840 onwards, with the mariner's previous number (if any) being entered in the column after his birthplace. In the event of it becoming known that a man had died during the course of a voyage, that information is written across the remaining empty columns. This volume (BT 112/10) covers mariners whose surnames start with Bu and By (and McBu and McBy).

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Merchant Seamen
 (1835-1844)
Railway Subscription Contracts (1845)
21,386,703 6s 4d was promised by about 10,000 subscribers of less than 2,000 per contract to the nearly 200 railway bills deposited in the Private Bill Office during the Session of Parliament for 1845. This alphabetical list gives the full names of the subscribers (surname first), description (i. e., occupation), place of abode, a numerical reference to the title of the railway, the amount subscribed to each, and total. There is a separate key to the titles of the railways.

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Railway Subscription Contracts
 (1845)
Creditors and solicitors in England and Wales (1846)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. This is the index to the names of the solicitors and petitioning creditors, from the issues from January to December 1846.

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Creditors and solicitors in England and Wales
 (1846)
The Edinburgh Gazette (1846)
The Edinburgh Gazette is the official publication in which various Scottish legal notices are issued, as well as promotions and casualty lists for the British army as a whole, and brief lists of English bankrupts. The key source for tracing details of Scottish bankruptcies, insolvencies, and dissolutions of business partnerships.

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The Edinburgh Gazette 
 (1846)
Freeholders in county Dublin (1873-1875)
Owners of an acre or more, whether resident there or elsewhere: with their addresses; the acreage; and a valuation of the land. The survey commenced in February 1873, the last returns being received in November 1875.

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Freeholders in county Dublin
 (1873-1875)
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