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Burgesse Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'burgesse'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 32 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular (1503)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 23 September 1503 by John bishop of Mayo, suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular
 (1503)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1558-1570)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1558-1570)
Inhabitants of Somerset (1607-1625)
The Reverend E. H. Bates prepared extracts from the Somerset quarter session records of 1607 to 1625 for publication by the Somerset Record Society (xxiii) in 1907. The period is covered by quarter sessions minute book 1 (1613 to 1620) and part of book 2 (1620-1627); these are based on the rolls of recognizances (taken, discharged and forfeited); criminal indictments (not touched on in Bates's extracts); and sessions rolls 1 to 16 (abstracted by A. J. Monday). The records covered and illustrated by these extracts are introduced under the heads Sessions Business; Relief of the Poor; Apprentices, Bastards and Lunatics; Charities (Alms- and Pest-Houses); Housing the Poor; Roads and Bridges; Rates and Appeals; Houses of Correction; and Drink Traffic.

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Inhabitants of Somerset
 (1607-1625)
St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1630)
Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms
 (1630)
St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1630)
Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides
 (1630)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
Wiltshire freeholders (1625-1645)
Inquisitions post mortem were held after the death of freeholders who held their estates in capite or in chief, i. e., directly from the crown. The inquisition, held by the royal escheator upon the oath of jurors from the county who were also normally freeholders, recorded what estates the deceased had held, by what tenure, what they were worth, the date of death, who was the next heir, and whether the heir was of age. The sample scan shows an unusually brief inquisition: these abstracts usually run to two or three pages of print.

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Wiltshire freeholders
 (1625-1645)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1648)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1648)
Hope Easter Roll: Bradwall (1658)
J. Charles Cox in 1889 published this transcript 'from some folio papers pinned together, pertaining to the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield, which are indorsed “Hope Easter Booke, pro annis, 1658, 1659, 1660 : Arthur Jeynson, George Armestrong.” The entries for the two last years are short and fragmentary, but a literal copy is given of the whole of the year 1658. The list is evidently a complete record of those who paid their accustomed ecclesiastical dues at Easter, according to custom, and hence may be looked upon as a full census of all the householders of this extensive parish'. Names of heads of household are given, with abbreviations such as ap. for beehive, vac. for cow, vit. for calf, describing the animals on which tithe was due; but also fil., mat. and pat. to show where the payment included dues on behalf of child, mother, or father. The amounts stated in the columns on the right are not, as usual, pounds, shillings and pence, but rather shillings, pence and halfpence. There are separate returns for the townships and hamlets of Abney and Grange; Aston; Bradwall; Brough and Shatton; Coplow Dale and Beriston; Great Hucklow; Greenlow; Haslebadge; High Lowe, Stooke and Padley; Hope; Little Hucklow; Neither Ashop; Offerton; Pindale End; Shalcrosse; Thornhill; Wardlow; Windemill House; and Woodland.

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Hope Easter Roll: Bradwall
 (1658)
Stockport Court Leet (1661)
This Court Leet and Court Baron with View of Frankpledge for the barony of Stockport was held 7th May in the 13th year of king Charles II. The court record, in a mixture of Latin and English, lists the jury, and proceeds to give their findings on recent trespasses, largely petty matters such as breach of the assizes of bread, ale and meat (presented by the alefounders), and minor nuisances (presented by the burlymen and the scavengers). The amercements were assessed by the affeerers, whose names are also given.

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Stockport Court Leet
 (1661)
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