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Buge Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'buge'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 4 records (displaying 1 to 4): 

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1569-1578)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1569 to June 1578, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by John Hill Burton, Historiographer Royal for Scotland, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1878. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1569-1578)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners: excluded names (1569-1578)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1569 to June 1578, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by John Hill Burton, Historiographer Royal for Scotland, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1878. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. In his preface to the first volume, Burton remarked that "There might perhaps be objections to the abundance of names of persons and places unknown to fame; but it was considered that in such a work the proper names of all persons and places occurring in the Register should be preserved, to be at the service of genealogical as well as historical investigators". But by this, second, volume, he decided that complete coverage was impractical, with "the crowding in of proper names, all but a few being the names of obscure persons ... Borderers are called up in considerable groups, and ordered to find, or recorded as having found, sureties for giving compensation to persons plundered, or for good conduct for the future. Several burgesses are sometimes entered in a minute about a Corporation quarrel. When the particulars of unimportant private litigations are omitted, the names remain." He therefore devised this 'Index of Names excluded from the Text', giving name, conditions, and date in register.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners: excluded names
 (1569-1578)
Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London (1834)
The public prints of December 1834 carried this loyal address to king William IV of merchants, bankers, shipowners, traders and others connected with the city of London, requesting 'permission at the present juncture to address your Majesty for the purpose of renewing the expression of our dutiful and loyal attachment to your Majesty’s person and crown. Deeply sensible of the practical blessings we have hitherto enjoyed under our wisely mixed constitution of King, Lords, and Commons, and feeling that the free and legitimate exercise of the Royal prerogative forms an integral part of that constitution (as essential to the maintenance of our own liberties as to the power and dignity of the Throne), we beg humbly to assure your Majesty of our determination steadfastly to uphold the same by every means in our power. 'Feeling, in common with all classes of your Majesty’s subjects, the deep importance of applying to all real abuses, wherever they may be found, a wholesome and timely correction, and of effecting in our excellent institutions every improvement of which careful examination and experience may prove them to be susceptible, we desire further dutifully to express our entire confidence that these useful purposes will ever occupy your Majesty’s paternal care. Nor can we permit ourselves to believe that the importance of these objects will be less apparent to those to whom the powers of government have been recently intrusted.' Full names are given (or surname with initials), and address. Over 5000 subscribed.

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Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London
 (1834)
Members of Oxford University: Men (1931)
The Oxford University Calendar for 1931 includes this list of all living members of the university, i. e. not only undergraduates and members of staff, but also all surviving graduates from earlier generations. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname, then by college in order of foundation. Surnames are given, initials, highest degree, name of college, and then the year of graduating the first degree. For undergraduates only name and college is given. An asterisk before a surname indicates a member on the foundation of the college. There are separate lists for men and women.

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Members of Oxford University: Men
 (1931)
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