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Bucke Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bucke'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 115 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Liberate Rolls (1260-1267)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 45th to 51st years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1260-1267)
Worcestershire Inhabitants (1280)
The Worcestershire Lay Subsidy roll of about 1280 lists lay inhabitants of each township of the shire and of each ward of the city of Worcester, with the amount of tax payable by each. Latin.

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Worcestershire Inhabitants
 (1280)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1275-1295)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1898. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1275-1295)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire (1297)
Taxation roll of the lay (non-clergy) inhabitants of Yorkshire from the 25th year of the reign of king Edward I. Latin

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire
 (1297)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1294-1303)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1902. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c. The volume also includes two stray inquests, from 1245 and 1282.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1294-1303)
Worcestershire Inhabitants (1327)
The Worcestershire Lay Subsidy roll of the 1st year of king Edward III lists lay inhabitants of each township of the shire and of the five boroughs of Droitwich (Wych), Dudley, Evesham, Kidderminster and Worcester, with the amount of tax payable by each. The roll was edited for the Worcestershire Historical Society by the Reverend F. J. Eld, and published in 1895.

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Worcestershire Inhabitants
 (1327)
Clergy at Beverley Minster (1322-1347)
The minster (collegiate church) of St John of Beverley in Yorkshire was an important foundation with extensive ecclesiastical and temporal rights exercised by the chapter. The main register of the administration in both respects was the chapter act book, and this edition of the act book from 2 February 1322 to 19 November 1347 was edited by Arthur Francis Leach for the Surtees Society and published in 1903. The act book material occupies pages 1 to 136; to this were added extracts relating to Beverley from the registers of the Archbishops of York from 1279 to 1381; miscellaneous documents from York Minster manuscripts and the British Museum from 1135 to 1314; and a copy of the Beverley Provost's Book, compiled in 1417, but with material from the preceding centuries. All these sources are covered by this index: but the bulk of the personal references are from the chapter act book, and relate to clergy at or connected with Beverley.

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Clergy at Beverley Minster
 (1322-1347)
English knights at Agincourt (1415)
At the battle of Agincourt, 25 October 1415, English forces under king Henry V inflicted a signal defeat on the French forces led by the Constable D'Albret. The English are said to have numbered about 15,000 men. This list of 'The Names of the Dukes, Erles, Barons, Knights, Esquires, Serviteurs and others that wer withe the Excellent Prince King Henry the Fifte at the Battell of Agincourt' is of the leaders of the English forces and of the knights (lances) in their retinues: of the archers, for which the battle is famous, hardly a handful are named. Nicholas Harris Nicolas, the antiquarian, found this list accidentally among the manuscripts in the British Museum, and published it, with an extensive account of the battle, in 1827.

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English knights at Agincourt
 (1415)
Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset (1001-1500)
Three early registers of the dean and chapter of Wells - the Liber Albus I (White Book; R I), Liber Albus II (R III), and Liber Ruber (Red Book; R II, section i) - were edited by W. H. B. Bird for the Historical Manuscripts Commissioners and published in 1907. These three books comprise, with some repetition, a cartulary of possessions of the cathedral, with grants of land dating back as early as the 8th century, well before the development of hereditary surnames in England; acts of the dean and chapter; and surveys of their estates, mostly in Somerset.

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Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset
 (1001-1500)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular (1506)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 19 December 1506, by bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Longdon parish church.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular
 (1506)
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