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Bowren Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bowren'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Militia in Carhampton hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Carhampton, Culbone (Kilner), Cutcombe, (the market town of) Dunster, Exford, Luckham (Luccombe), Luxborough, (the seaport and market town of) Minehead, Oare, Porlock, Selworthy, Stoke Pero, Timberscombe, Treborough, Withycombe and Wootton Courtney. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Carhampton hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1701-1753)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1755 to 1833 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1701-1753)
National ArchivesApprentices (1756)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 13 September to 31 December 1756.

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Apprentices
 (1756)
National ArchivesSailors on board H. M. S. Goliath (1795-1798)
His Majesty's ship the Goliath took part in the destruction of the French fleet in Aboukir Bay at the mouth of the Nile ('the Battle of the Nile') on the evening of the 1st and morning of the 2nd August 1798. This is the muster book for 1 April to 30 September 1798: being a continuation book in a series covering wages and victualling from December 1795, it also includes the names of some men who had died, deserted or been discharged from the ship from then to April 1798. Of the ship's complement of 590, this index covers the sailors, volunteers, and boys, as well as the supernumeraries: but not the marines, or the French prisoners taken after the battle.

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Sailors on board H. M. S. Goliath
 (1795-1798)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Dorset (1802)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/70

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Apprentices registered in Dorset
 (1802)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices and clerks (1802)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 June to 31 December 1802. IR 1/39

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Masters of apprentices and clerks
 (1802)
Inhabitants of Dorset (1830)
Pigot & Co.'s National Commercial Directory lists traders, farmers and private residents in the county.

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Inhabitants of Dorset
 (1830)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname. BT 112/7

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
Anglican Schoolmistresses (1850)
The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.

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Anglican Schoolmistresses
 (1850)
Pupil Teachers in Dorsetshire: Boys (1851)
The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).

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Pupil Teachers in Dorsetshire: Boys
 (1851)
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