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Bowreman Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bowreman'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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The English in France (1421-1422)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 9th year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1421 to 20 March 1422) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883.

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The English in France
 (1421-1422)
Close Rolls (1447-1454)
The close rolls of the 26th to 32nd years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1447-1454)
Militia in Wells Forum hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Binegar, Dinder, Evercreech, Litton, Priddy, (the city of) Wells, Westbury, West Cranmore and Wookey. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Wells Forum hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1611-1660)
English administration of Ireland (1660-1662)
The State Papers relating to Ireland (preserved in the Public Record Office in England) from the restoration of the monarchy in June 1660 to December 1662 were calendared by R. P. Mahaffy and published in 1905. Most of the volume contains abstracts of correspondence with the Lord Lieutenant and other officials: but the first 150 pages consists of petitions made, upon the restoration, for lands, offices, &c. that had been lost during the Commonwealth period. There is also an abstract of the contents (pages 648 to 660) of a thin manuscript book among the papers, containing petitions and papers relating to the estate of the Marquis of Antrim, which had been divided up among English and Irish Protestant soldiers and 'adventurers' and was now again in contention.

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English administration of Ireland
 (1660-1662)
Inhabitants of Salisbury (1443-1704)
A collection of transcripts of churchwardens' accounts from the parishes of St Edmund and St Thomas in Sarum (Salisbury in Wiltshire) by Henry James Fowle Swayne, the Recorder of Wilton, was published by the Wilts Record Society in 1896. The greater part of these accounts relate to expenditure to workmen on the church fabric, and income for rent of pews and the tolling of bells and obsequies for parishioners. There are several sources covered: the churchwardens' accounts for St Edmund's for 1443 to 1461; for St Thomas's 1545 to 1690, and some notes from 1704; and accounts of the stewards of the Fraternity of Jesus Mass founded in St Edmund's.

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Inhabitants of Salisbury
 (1443-1704)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1738)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 7 October 1738

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1738)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1798)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1798)
Anglican Clergy (1817)
The Clerical Guide for 1817 includes this alphabetical list of rectors (R.), vicars (V.) and other Anglican clergy. Names of the king's chaplains-in-ordinary, and of churches and chapels of peculiar or exempt jurisdiction, are printed in italics. The clergy are listed more or less alphabetically by surname, with initial or christian name.

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Anglican Clergy
 (1817)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname. BT 112/7

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
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