Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Boughan Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'boughan'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

Buy all
Get all 9 records to view, to save and print for £50.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Freemen of London (1540-1550)
The long series of mediaeval registers and books of admission of the freemen of London was destroyed by fire in 1786. Thirty surviving charred leaves were gathered together and rebound, becoming Egerton MS 2408 in the British Museum. The order is jumbled and generally speaking none can be dated with certainty, although all belong to the very end of the reign of Henry VIII and the start of the reign of his son, Edward VI. These are pages from the admission books. Each entry here usually gives the name of the person admitted to the freedom; his father's name, address and occupation; his entitlement to the freedom, usually by having served out an apprenticeship to a citizen, naming the master and his trade. Then there may follow a cross-reference to M. or N., being two volumes of another set of official books denoted by the letters of the alphabet, and following each other in chronological sequence, which evidently gave details of entries into apprenticeships. These other books no longer exist: but the dates given for entry do identify the start of the apprenticeship, and so give by implication a date for the eventual admission to freedom. In the margin is the name of the city ward and the total of the fee and fine paid on admission.

BOUGHAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Freemen of London
 (1540-1550)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1550-1552)
The Privy Council of Edward VI was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

BOUGHAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1550-1552)
PCC Probate Abstracts (1650-1651)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator

BOUGHAN. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
PCC Probate Abstracts
 (1650-1651)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

BOUGHAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
Saved from the Wreck of The Harpooner: 4th Royal Veteran Battalion (1816)
Return of the men, women and children saved from and lost in the wreck of The Harpooner, 11 November 1816. Most were soldiers, their wives and children, from the 4th Royal Veteran Battalion, and the Royal Artillery, but also some from the 41st, 49th, 76th, 99th and 103rd regiments, as well as De Meuron's Regiment and the Glengary Fencibles.

BOUGHAN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Saved from the Wreck of The Harpooner: 4th Royal Veteran Battalion
 (1816)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname. BT 112/7

BOUGHAN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
Irish Insolvents (1844)
Insolvency notices for Ireland: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links, especially for emigrants

BOUGHAN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Irish Insolvents
 (1844)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

BOUGHAN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot, based at Cork, embarked for India in September 1858, and was transferred to China in 1860; moved to South Africa in 1865, and returned to England in 1869. The regiment took part in the capture of Pekin.

BOUGHAN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British infantry fighting in China
 (1860)
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.