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Bolston Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bolston'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 7 records (displaying 1 to 7): 

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Worcestershire Inhabitants (1327)
The Worcestershire Lay Subsidy roll of the 1st year of king Edward III lists lay inhabitants of each township of the shire and of the five boroughs of Droitwich (Wych), Dudley, Evesham, Kidderminster and Worcester, with the amount of tax payable by each. The roll was edited for the Worcestershire Historical Society by the Reverend F. J. Eld, and published in 1895.

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Worcestershire Inhabitants
 (1327)
Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

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Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors (1673-1692)
The only surviving complete volume of the records of the courts held by the Governor and Assistants of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay is for the period 1673 to 1692. It was transcribed by John Noble, and published by order of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Boston, New England, as County Commissioners of the County of Suffolk, Massachusetts. Under English law overseas colonies were generally deemed to fall under the jurisdiction of the Admiralty, and were subject to English law varied by local circumstances. These Courts of Assistants therefore also function as Courts of Admiralty; the courts had jurisiction over criminal cases and also in civil disputes between parties. In practice, many of the names that occur in the record are just those of the members of the grand jury and the lesser juries (appointed from among the adult male householders of the colony) before whom the cases were tried.

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Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors
 (1673-1692)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Northamptonshire and Warwickshire (1750-1754)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered in Northamptonshire and Warwickshire
 (1750-1754)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname. BT 112/7

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
National ArchivesMen of the Royal Artillery fighting in South Africa (1877-1879)
What is commonly called the Zulu War Medal was awarded to those British soldiers who fought in a series of conflicts in southern Africa from 1877 (the Kaffir War) through to 1879 (the Zulu War). In 1880 the various units submitted returns of the officers, non-commissioned officers and men 'entitled to the Medal for Military Operations in South Africa during 1877-8-9' and these 'medal rolls' are now in the National Archives. The returns are made with the information arranged in twelve columns: 1. Rank and name 2. Regimental number and rank at the time the medal was earned 3. Whether in possession of medal for previous wars 4. Whether engaged against the Gaikas, Galekas and other Kaffir tribes 1877-8 5. Whether engaged against Pokwane 1878 6. Whether engaged against the Griquas 1878 7. Whether engaged against the Zulus 1879 8. Whether engaged against Sekukuni as set forth in Par. 2. G. O. 9. Whether engaged against Moirosi's stronghold 10. Entitled to medal without clasp under Par. 4. 11. Serving with regiment, depot, dead, discharged, deserted, &c. 12. Notes and cross-references to the Adjutant-General's medal lists. WO 100/46.

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Men of the Royal Artillery fighting in South Africa
 (1877-1879)
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