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Boggest Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'boggest'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 5 records (displaying 1 to 5): 

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Royalist delinquents in county Durham and Northumberland, their successors, tenants, debtors and creditors (1648-1660)
King Charles I was executed 30 January 1649, the kingship was abolished and government by a Council of State was established 14 February 1649. Oliver Cromwell became Lord Protector 16 December 1653; died 3 September 1658; and was succeeded by his son Richard, who abdicated 24 May 1659. Charles II was established on the throne 29 May 1660. From 1648 to 1660 parliament sequestrated royalists' estates, restoring many by a process of heavy fines called compounding; this was administered by the Committee for Compounding, working through county committees. These raised considerable amounts of money, money which was vitally necessary for maintaining the parliamentary army's campaigns to subdue opposition in the three kingdoms - England, Scotland and Ireland. The raising and delivery of these monies was the responsibility of the Committee for Advance of Money (C. A. M.). The records of these committees were detailed and extensive, amounting to about 300 volumes, and were calendared for the Public Record Office by Mary Anne Everett Green. Abstracts of the county Durham and Northumberland entries were collated by Richard Welford with a manuscript transcript of the proceedings of the parliamentary commissioners in county Durham surviving in Durham cathedral library, and published by the Surtees Society in 1905. The persons named in these abstracts are not only the delinquents themselves, and those who succeeded them in their estates, but tenants, debtors and creditors, and local constables and officials of the committees.

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Royalist delinquents in county Durham and Northumberland, their successors, tenants, debtors and creditors
 (1648-1660)
Treasury Books (1689-1692)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies.

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Treasury Books
 (1689-1692)
Treasury Books (1693-1696)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, from January 1693 to March 1696. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors. The calendar was prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty's Treasury and published in 1935, from letters patent, privy seals, royal sign manuals and warrants, treasury warrants, commissions, orders, letters, memorials, reports and other entries, all not of the nature of Treasury Minutes.

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Treasury Books
 (1693-1696)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
The Royal Household (1741)
'A General List, or Catalogue, Of all the Offices and Officers Employ'd In the several Branches of his Majesty's Government Ecclesiastical, Civil, Military, &c. In South-Britain, or England' gives the names (and often the annual salaries) of the government functionaries, civil servants, churchmen and military, systematically arranged section by section. Section 79 lists the King's Officers and Servants in Ordinary Above Stairs, under the Lord Chamberlain, including the Grooms of the Bedchamber, the Gentlemen of the Privy Chamber, Cup Bearers, Carvers, Gentlemen-Sewers, Gentlemen-Ushers of the Privy Chamber, Daily Waiters, Grooms of the Privy Chamber, Quarterly Waiters in Ordinary, Sewers of the Chamber, Pages of the Presence Chamber, Grooms of the Great Chamber, Coffer Bearers, Pages of the Bedchamber and Back Stairs, Officers in the Removing Wardrobe, Standing Wardrobe keepers, the Master of the Robes and his officials, the Waiters of the Robes, Laundress of the Body Linen, Sempstress, Starcher, Necessary Women, Treasurer and Comptroller of the Chamber, Master of the Jewel Office, Master of the Ceremonies, Serjeants-at-Arms, and a host of messengers, musicians, physicians, apothecaries and surgeons; together with the housekeepers for the various palaces, and other royal servants and officials throughout the realm.

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The Royal Household
 (1741)
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