Search between and
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Bodeman Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bodeman'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 4 records (displaying 1 to 4): 

Buy all
Get all 4 records to view, to save and print for £18.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)
The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This second part contains the charters numbered DXCIV to MCLXXXIX. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated. The charters in this section are arranged by place, under the heads 'Normanby; Martona; Thornaby; Ugthorpe et Pecibiggyng; Levingtona; Jarum; Castle Levington; Kepwyck; Feyceby; Atona; Thresk; Neuton; Estona; Lackenby; Lyum; Cotum; Scheltona; Brottona; Moresom; Glasedale Daneby et Moresum; Kylton; Lofthus; Esingtona; Lyverton; Daneby; Glasdale; Uggethorpe; Percybyggyng; Sletholme; Scalynge; Redker; Merske; Hesele; Lunde super le Walde; Kirkburn; Rotsea; Bainton; Tibthorpe; Ingleby Arncliff; East Harlsey; Sawcock; Scarth; Stokesley; Kirkby-in-Cleveland; Battersby; Stainton-in-Cleveland; Maltby; Ayresome; York; Sinnington; Barningham and Newsham; Aylesby; Kelsterne; Bridekirk and Appleton; Aislaby; Hart and Hartlepool; Castle Eden; and Annandale'. Three further sections are added from other sources: 1. Documents connected with the burning of the priory church in 1289; 2. Extracts from the registers of the archbishops of York relating to the priory, 1238 to 1337; 3. A rent roll of the priory of about 1300 (pp. 412 to 450), giving many names of tenants.

BODEMAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Guisborough Cartulary
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1350-1354)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 24th to the 27th years of the reign of king Edward III (25 January 1350 to 24 January 1354) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. F. Isaacson, and published in 1907. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons.

BODEMAN. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

BODEMAN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
Masters of Merchantmen (1822)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Bk, barque; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), patent felt (P F), copper fastened (c f), copper bolted (c b), or copper repaired (C rp) sometimes with a date, such as (18)18. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1822, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repair; len. lengthened; lrp. large repair; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; Srprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; Hk., hackmetack; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel; W. O., white oak. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was American property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; a few were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; Hn, Harrington; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Mt., Maryport; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Pl., Plymouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Wo., Workington; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second) and its stores (1, first; 2, second) and the year of survey, e. g. 09 for 1809, or, if surveyed during 1821, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to masters in the main list and the supplement.

BODEMAN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of Merchantmen
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.