Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Blore Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'blore'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 140 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Open Access
Buying all 140 results of this search individually would cost £776.00. But you can have free access to all 140 records for a year, to view, to save and print, for £100. Save £676.00. More...

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Curia Regis Rolls (1196-1201)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

BLORE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1196-1201)
Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire (1344-1360)
The register of bishop John de Trillek of Hereford, containing general diocesan business, but also including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire.

BLORE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire
 (1344-1360)
Payments by the English crown (1370)
The Exitus or Issue Roll of the Exchequer, compiled by the Clerk of the Pell, recorded all issues or payments made by the English crown: presents of plate and jewellery to foreign nobility; household payments to officers and servants; wardrobe payments; alms; payments for the upkeep of royal palaces, manors, residences and chapels; repayments of loans to the king; payments to messengers and couriers; wages of mercenaries; the upkeep of the navy; ransoming of hostages; maintenance of castles, forts, garrisons and fortifications; salaries of judges and other officers of the courts of Chancery, Exchequer, King's Bench and Common Pleas; as well as a host of miscellaneous other items. This is a translation of the text of the roll for the 44th year of the reign of king Edward III, when Thomas de Brantingham, Bishop of Exeter, was Lord High Treasurer of England.

BLORE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Payments by the English crown
 (1370)
Fine Rolls (1369-1377)
The fine rolls of the 43rd to 51st years of the reign of king Edward III record part of the government administration in England, with orders sent out day by day to individual officers, and commitment of particular responsibilities and duties. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

BLORE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Fine Rolls
 (1369-1377)
Landowners and tenants in Derbyshire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

BLORE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Landowners and tenants in Derbyshire
 (1345-1485)
Secretary of State's Papers (1600)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

BLORE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Secretary of State's Papers
 (1600)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

BLORE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
British in the East (1625-1629)
The East India State Papers centre on the records of the East India Company, trading to India, the East Indies, Persia and China. They include the Court Minutes of the East India Company.

BLORE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British in the East
 (1625-1629)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1639-1644)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)

BLORE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1639-1644)
Besiegers of Colchester (1648)
The siege of Colchester was one of the most severe of the Civil War, and lasted from 14 June to 28 August 1648. Kent and Essex Royalists on their way into Norfolk and Suffolk turned aside into Colchester, hoping to get recruits there. Fairfax pursued from his headquarters in London, and when on 12 June he appeared with 5,000 men they were obliged to make hasty preparations for defence. The town was ill-fitted to stand a siege, and the 4,000 Royalist troops were most of them newly levied and ill-armed, but after a repulse on 14 June 14, Fairfax realized that a long siege was inevitable, and busied himself with raising forts to completely isolate the town. On 2 July the work of circumvallation was finished, and though meeting with fierce resistance, Fairfax gained post after post. Early in August famine added to the misery of the besieged, and the citizens began to clamour for surrender. On 19 August, Norwich, the Royalist leader, asked for terms; negotiations went on for some days, and finally on 28 August, Fairfax occupied the town. Three of the Royalist leaders were shot, and the soldiers were sent to labour in the West Indies, or to enforced military service under the Venetian Republic. The townsmen were made to pay a heavy fine. These accounts list disbursements to workmen digging the fortifications and to artificers, soldiers and officers involved in the siege. The total sum paid was about 1,695.

BLORE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Besiegers of Colchester
 (1648)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.