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Blewitt Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'blewitt'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 162 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims (1464-1524)
Criminals could evade pursuit by claiming sanctuary in Durham Cathedral. Persons who took refuge fled to the north door of the cathedral, and knocked for admission. There were two chambers over the door in which men slept, for the purpose of admitting fugitives at any hour of the night. As soon as anyone was so admitted, the Galilee bell was immediately tolled, to give notice that someone had taken sanctuary. The offender was required to declare before witnesses the nature of his offence, and to toll a bell in token of his demanding the privilege of sanctuary. He was then provided with a gown of black cloth with a yellow cross, called St Cuthbert's Cross, upon the left shoulder. A grate was provided near the south door to sleep upon, and for 37 days sufficient provisions and bedding were provided. But within 40 days he had to appear before the coroner, clothed in sackcloth, and be branded on his right hand with the sign of the letter A. This signified that he was swearing to abjure the realm: he was then free to leave the country unhindered. The petitions for immunity were entered in the diocesan registers, usually with the marginal note 'Peticio Immunitatis': those from 18 June 1464 to 10 September 1524 (the privilege was finally abolished in 1624) were edited and printed by the Surtees Society in 1837 under the title Sanctuarium Dunelmense. Some of the criminals came from a considerable distance: the great majority were murderers or homicides. Each entry usually gives full name, original address, (often) trade, a brief description of the crime, often with date, and usually the name of the victim, as well as the witnesses to the petition. This index covers all the surnames given.

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Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims
 (1464-1524)
Official Papers (1547-1580)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1547-1580)
Inhabitants of Somerset (1607-1625)
The Reverend E. H. Bates prepared extracts from the Somerset quarter session records of 1607 to 1625 for publication by the Somerset Record Society (xxiii) in 1907. The period is covered by quarter sessions minute book 1 (1613 to 1620) and part of book 2 (1620-1627); these are based on the rolls of recognizances (taken, discharged and forfeited); criminal indictments (not touched on in Bates's extracts); and sessions rolls 1 to 16 (abstracted by A. J. Monday). The records covered and illustrated by these extracts are introduced under the heads Sessions Business; Relief of the Poor; Apprentices, Bastards and Lunatics; Charities (Alms- and Pest-Houses); Housing the Poor; Roads and Bridges; Rates and Appeals; Houses of Correction; and Drink Traffic.

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Inhabitants of Somerset
 (1607-1625)
Middlesex Sessions (1625-1666)
Incidents from the Middlesex Sessions Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the volumes of Gaol Delivery Register, Books and Rolls, Sessions of Peace Register, and Process Books of Indictments for the county of Middlesex from the death of king James I to the Great Fire of London. The references at the end of each item indicate the volume in question, the abbreviations being G. D. for Gaol Delivery, S. P. for Sessions of Peace, and S. O. T. for Session of Oyer and Terminer; occasionally preceded by S. for Special or G. for general, or followed by R. for Roll or Reg. for Register. It should be noted that, in the case of 'true bills' or indictments, the abstract starts with the date on which the offence took place, the date of the conviction &c. being at the end of the entry. These abstracts, prepared by John Cordy Jeaffreson for the Middlesex County Record Society, are far from being a complete calendar of these extensive records; his purpose was, in part, to notice 'every parchment that should exhibit a famous person's name or any other feature of personal interest'.

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Middlesex Sessions
 (1625-1666)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1680-1691)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)

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Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1680-1691)
Treasury Books (1697-1698)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, from 1 October 1697 to 31 August 1698. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

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Treasury Books
 (1697-1698)
Hastings family correspondence (1528-1699)
John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, of which this is the second volume, published in 1930, Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work being completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley. This volume covers four categories of the records: correspondence of the Hastings family 1528 to 1699; newsletters sent by professional reporters in London 1669 to 1693; papers relating to the Band of Gentlemen Pensioners, of which Theophilus 7th earl of Huntingdon was captaon, 1677 to 1685; and correspondence of the Rawdon family, 1641 to 1694, including papers of George Monck, afterwards Duke of Albemarle, when commanding in Ulster.

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Hastings family correspondence
 (1528-1699)
Treasury Books (1699-1700)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain and the colonies, from August 1699 to September 1700. These include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors. The calendar was prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty's Treasury and published in 1933, from Treasury Minute Books xi and xii (T29/11-12); King's Warrant Book xx (T52/20); Money Books xiv and xv (T53/14-15); Order Book v (T60/5); Disposition Book xv (T61/15); Out Letters (General) xvi (T27/16); Out Letters (Customs) xiv (T11/14); Reference Book vii (Index 4621); Warrants not Relating to Money xvi (T54/16); Out Letters (Ireland) vii and viii (T14/7-8); Caveat Book i (T64/40); and Out Letters (Plantations Auditor) ii (T64/89).

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Treasury Books
 (1699-1700)
Official Papers (1703-1704)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad. June 1703 to April 1704.

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Official Papers
 (1703-1704)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Lichfield in Staffordshire (1713-1715)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. July 1713 to April 1715. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered at Lichfield in Staffordshire
 (1713-1715)
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